Title

Occupational Science and Transforming Cultures of Nursing Homes

Presenter Information

Wendy Wood
Jennifer Strand
Sara Metheny

Start Time

26-10-2007 2:00 PM

End Time

26-10-2007 3:30 PM

Abstract

A nursing home reform movement, centrally concerned with an ethic of occupation, has attained national prominence over the past 15 years with little involvement of occupational scientists or therapists. This movement is committed to abilities-focused care that supports residents‚ expressions of their retained capacities in context of valued activities and relationships. It is also committed to person-centered care that is individualized to each resident’s life history and current wants and needs. Reforms seek to transform medical models of nursing home care into community models where everyday occupations enhance both resident quality of life and staff satisfaction and retention. Nursing home reforms, however promising, are very difficult to implement. One reason is a lack of effective education. Frontline caregivers must not only learn how to provide person-centered and abilities-focused care, they must also be organizationally rewarded and valued for provision of such care. A great need exists to develop effective caregiver educational programs, within supportive organizational cultures, that advance quality care while empowering caregivers and increasing work satisfaction. This panel will describe, and elicit discussion about, four dimensions of a funded research and educational project that was informed by occupational science and committed to nursing home reform.

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Oct 26th, 2:00 PM Oct 26th, 3:30 PM

Occupational Science and Transforming Cultures of Nursing Homes

A nursing home reform movement, centrally concerned with an ethic of occupation, has attained national prominence over the past 15 years with little involvement of occupational scientists or therapists. This movement is committed to abilities-focused care that supports residents‚ expressions of their retained capacities in context of valued activities and relationships. It is also committed to person-centered care that is individualized to each resident’s life history and current wants and needs. Reforms seek to transform medical models of nursing home care into community models where everyday occupations enhance both resident quality of life and staff satisfaction and retention. Nursing home reforms, however promising, are very difficult to implement. One reason is a lack of effective education. Frontline caregivers must not only learn how to provide person-centered and abilities-focused care, they must also be organizationally rewarded and valued for provision of such care. A great need exists to develop effective caregiver educational programs, within supportive organizational cultures, that advance quality care while empowering caregivers and increasing work satisfaction. This panel will describe, and elicit discussion about, four dimensions of a funded research and educational project that was informed by occupational science and committed to nursing home reform.