Title

Occupational Science in Correctional Institutions and Community Corrections: Support for Occupational Enrichment

Start Time

26-10-2007 3:45 PM

End Time

26-10-2007 4:15 PM

Abstract

Occupational scientists offer a unique perspective on the crisis in the American criminal justice system. One in every 32 American adults is in custody or supervision of a county, state, or federal correctional system. The latest statistics from the Bureau of Justice indicate that in 2005, over 7 million or 3.2% of American adults were on probation or parole, in jail or prison, or serving out sentences in community settings. More than half the inmates of prisons and jails have recent histories or symptoms of mental health problems and more than 75% of them have co-occurring substance abuse issues. As the fastest growing segment in U.S. prisons, the female prison population surpasses that of males in all 50 states. These women have not only experienced poverty, abuse, mental health problems, and co-occurring disorders, they are often the only support and caregivers for their children. With 95% of all state inmates returning to communities, public safety and recidivism are primary concerns. The occupational implications are immense for those in custody, those reentering to communities, their families, and society. The inherent restrictions of criminal justice settings limit opportunities for occupational engagement and promote occupational deprivation. Occupational scientists are beginning to make crucial connections between occupational engagement and reductions in criminal behavior that suggest occupation as a means of promoting adaptive behaviors to reduce recidivism and increase public safety. The panelists present brief research and practice perspectives of how pre-release occupational enrichment affects post-release occupational functioning.

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Oct 26th, 3:45 PM Oct 26th, 4:15 PM

Occupational Science in Correctional Institutions and Community Corrections: Support for Occupational Enrichment

Occupational scientists offer a unique perspective on the crisis in the American criminal justice system. One in every 32 American adults is in custody or supervision of a county, state, or federal correctional system. The latest statistics from the Bureau of Justice indicate that in 2005, over 7 million or 3.2% of American adults were on probation or parole, in jail or prison, or serving out sentences in community settings. More than half the inmates of prisons and jails have recent histories or symptoms of mental health problems and more than 75% of them have co-occurring substance abuse issues. As the fastest growing segment in U.S. prisons, the female prison population surpasses that of males in all 50 states. These women have not only experienced poverty, abuse, mental health problems, and co-occurring disorders, they are often the only support and caregivers for their children. With 95% of all state inmates returning to communities, public safety and recidivism are primary concerns. The occupational implications are immense for those in custody, those reentering to communities, their families, and society. The inherent restrictions of criminal justice settings limit opportunities for occupational engagement and promote occupational deprivation. Occupational scientists are beginning to make crucial connections between occupational engagement and reductions in criminal behavior that suggest occupation as a means of promoting adaptive behaviors to reduce recidivism and increase public safety. The panelists present brief research and practice perspectives of how pre-release occupational enrichment affects post-release occupational functioning.