Title

Occupational Engagement Change Secondary to Significant Weight Loss

Presenter Information

Patricia Crist

Start Time

26-10-2007 11:45 AM

End Time

26-10-2007 1:45 PM

Abstract

Obesity is a major contemporary health issue and has a plethora of interventions reflecting a multitude of approaches. For the morbidly obese who experience significant occupational loss or inabilities, bariatric surgery is an option to change the physical condition of the individuals. However, without re-engagement or participation, the establishment of new healthier habit patterns, the ‘short-term gains from surgery can be loss. An outcome study is underway to monitor the lifestyle changes afforded individuals following bariatric surgery to promote long term weight loss and healthier living. The questions to be included in this study are: What are the important occupational changes noted by patients are various stages of bariatric intervention? What changes in occupation result following bariatric surgery? What is the impact on quality of life and activity engagement? What is motivational for the bariatric patient to make significant lifestyle changes ( eating, sleeping/rest, exercise, etc.) to maintain the post-surgery weight loss long term? How can this information be translated into patient education programming to support healthier habits? The initial methodology for this study will be presented along with current patient outcomes and education programming. The focus of this discussion will be to address the challenge of fitting this project into the context of the typical surgeon’s practice as integral to overall programming. Are there valid ways to adapt the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure or other tools to monitor/counsel regarding occupational change? Motivation and quality of life are related to desire for and pursuit of participation. Are there ways to validly and reliably measure these changes from an occupational perspective? Ideas for integrating individual and group educational approaches to intervene at an occupational level will be explored. The speaker hopes to start a discourse regarding how occupational science can contribute uniquely to the interdisciplinary body of knowledge about obesity and weight loss and inform the practice of occupational therapy.

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Oct 26th, 11:45 AM Oct 26th, 1:45 PM

Occupational Engagement Change Secondary to Significant Weight Loss

Obesity is a major contemporary health issue and has a plethora of interventions reflecting a multitude of approaches. For the morbidly obese who experience significant occupational loss or inabilities, bariatric surgery is an option to change the physical condition of the individuals. However, without re-engagement or participation, the establishment of new healthier habit patterns, the ‘short-term gains from surgery can be loss. An outcome study is underway to monitor the lifestyle changes afforded individuals following bariatric surgery to promote long term weight loss and healthier living. The questions to be included in this study are: What are the important occupational changes noted by patients are various stages of bariatric intervention? What changes in occupation result following bariatric surgery? What is the impact on quality of life and activity engagement? What is motivational for the bariatric patient to make significant lifestyle changes ( eating, sleeping/rest, exercise, etc.) to maintain the post-surgery weight loss long term? How can this information be translated into patient education programming to support healthier habits? The initial methodology for this study will be presented along with current patient outcomes and education programming. The focus of this discussion will be to address the challenge of fitting this project into the context of the typical surgeon’s practice as integral to overall programming. Are there valid ways to adapt the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure or other tools to monitor/counsel regarding occupational change? Motivation and quality of life are related to desire for and pursuit of participation. Are there ways to validly and reliably measure these changes from an occupational perspective? Ideas for integrating individual and group educational approaches to intervene at an occupational level will be explored. The speaker hopes to start a discourse regarding how occupational science can contribute uniquely to the interdisciplinary body of knowledge about obesity and weight loss and inform the practice of occupational therapy.