Title

Out-Of-School Participation Patterns in Children with High Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder

Presenter Information

Claudia Hilton

Start Time

26-10-2007 11:45 AM

End Time

26-10-2007 1:45 PM

Abstract

Participation is essential to the growth and development of children, and continues to directly relate to an individual’s health and well-being. This study examined the differences in participation in out-of-school activities between typical children and those with high functioning autism spectrum disorders (HFASD), and the relationship between participation and social responsiveness. Methodology: HFASD children, ages 6 to 12 (N = 51) and a control group (N = 56), were assessed using the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS) and the Children’s Assessment of Participation and Enjoyment (CAPE). A bivariate correlational design was used to compare the scores. Results: Significant differences were seen in participation between groups and between SRS severity levels in overall diversity, intensity, with whom, and where CAPE scores, but no difference was seen in how much the participants report enjoying the activities in which they participate. Among the most participated in activities, all children participated in the largest number of recreational activities, but the HFASD children participated in more formal and fewer physical activities than the typical group. Conclusions: These findings indicate that participation in out-of-school activities is significantly different for children with HFASD in comparison to typical peers and that it is related to social responsiveness severity within HFASD. Comparing results from a quantitative measure of autistic characteristic severity with results of a variety of dimensions of participation, on a moderately large group of subjects, adds clarity to the understanding of participation patterns among children with HFASD. The findings indicate that participation is related to severity in HFASD and has significant importance for understanding the behavior patterns of children with HFASD. The results of this study also indicate that the more severe one’s social deficits, the less diversity will be seen in their activity participation, in with whom they participate, and in where they participate. In addition, greater severity is correlated with less frequency of participation. This is very concerning for children with greater severity, when considering the finding from a previous study that if adolescents do not have adequate leisure activities to fulfill social and individual requirements, their adolescence may be psychologically unsatisfactory and unhealthy.

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Oct 26th, 11:45 AM Oct 26th, 1:45 PM

Out-Of-School Participation Patterns in Children with High Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder

Participation is essential to the growth and development of children, and continues to directly relate to an individual’s health and well-being. This study examined the differences in participation in out-of-school activities between typical children and those with high functioning autism spectrum disorders (HFASD), and the relationship between participation and social responsiveness. Methodology: HFASD children, ages 6 to 12 (N = 51) and a control group (N = 56), were assessed using the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS) and the Children’s Assessment of Participation and Enjoyment (CAPE). A bivariate correlational design was used to compare the scores. Results: Significant differences were seen in participation between groups and between SRS severity levels in overall diversity, intensity, with whom, and where CAPE scores, but no difference was seen in how much the participants report enjoying the activities in which they participate. Among the most participated in activities, all children participated in the largest number of recreational activities, but the HFASD children participated in more formal and fewer physical activities than the typical group. Conclusions: These findings indicate that participation in out-of-school activities is significantly different for children with HFASD in comparison to typical peers and that it is related to social responsiveness severity within HFASD. Comparing results from a quantitative measure of autistic characteristic severity with results of a variety of dimensions of participation, on a moderately large group of subjects, adds clarity to the understanding of participation patterns among children with HFASD. The findings indicate that participation is related to severity in HFASD and has significant importance for understanding the behavior patterns of children with HFASD. The results of this study also indicate that the more severe one’s social deficits, the less diversity will be seen in their activity participation, in with whom they participate, and in where they participate. In addition, greater severity is correlated with less frequency of participation. This is very concerning for children with greater severity, when considering the finding from a previous study that if adolescents do not have adequate leisure activities to fulfill social and individual requirements, their adolescence may be psychologically unsatisfactory and unhealthy.