Title

The flow experiences of people with chronic pain; garnering support for occupation-based service delivery

Presenter Information

Katie Robinson

Start Time

26-10-2007 11:45 AM

End Time

26-10-2007 1:45 PM

Abstract

One in five adult Europeans live with chronic pain (Fricker 2003), the significance of chronic pain in both human and economic terms cannot be overstated. People with chronic pain face significant barriers to engagement in occupation and consequently participation in life. This paper will discuss current multidisciplinary biopsychosocial chronic pain services and illustrate how this model of service delivery is constructed upon a problematised view of people with chronic pain. Contemporary occupational therapy services for people with chronic pain will be critiqued to reveal a dualism of occupation based theory and reductionistic practice. Alternatives to current modes of service delivery will be presented with reference to findings from occupational science research. The results of pilot research on the flow experiences of people with chronic pain in Ireland will be reported to support an alternative model of service delivery which is occupation focused. Flow as a concept facilitates understanding of the texture of everyday life experiences through illumination of optimal experiences and is widely recognised as having much to offer occupational scientists. The application of flow theory to understanding the complex link between doing and well-being is of clear value to a community interested in the form, function and meaning of occupation. An experience sampling methodology study of the flow experiences of people with chronic pain in Ireland (n= >30) through electronic survey will be presented. Participants responded to a flow questionnaire (Csikszentmihalyi & Csikszentmihalyi 1988) loaded on palm pilots which were programmed (Experience Sampling Programme, Barrett & Feldman Barrett 1999) to bleep at random intervals eight times daily during waking hours over seven days. Thus the maximum completed number of questionnaires per participant was 56. Completion rates mirrored similar electronic diary studies. Results will be presented using the eight channel flow model (Massimini & Carli 1988) and interpreted with consideration of how experience is potentially mediated by chronic pain. It will be argued that these results support alternative modes of service delivery for people with chronic pain, where occupation is central to service delivery.

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Oct 26th, 11:45 AM Oct 26th, 1:45 PM

The flow experiences of people with chronic pain; garnering support for occupation-based service delivery

One in five adult Europeans live with chronic pain (Fricker 2003), the significance of chronic pain in both human and economic terms cannot be overstated. People with chronic pain face significant barriers to engagement in occupation and consequently participation in life. This paper will discuss current multidisciplinary biopsychosocial chronic pain services and illustrate how this model of service delivery is constructed upon a problematised view of people with chronic pain. Contemporary occupational therapy services for people with chronic pain will be critiqued to reveal a dualism of occupation based theory and reductionistic practice. Alternatives to current modes of service delivery will be presented with reference to findings from occupational science research. The results of pilot research on the flow experiences of people with chronic pain in Ireland will be reported to support an alternative model of service delivery which is occupation focused. Flow as a concept facilitates understanding of the texture of everyday life experiences through illumination of optimal experiences and is widely recognised as having much to offer occupational scientists. The application of flow theory to understanding the complex link between doing and well-being is of clear value to a community interested in the form, function and meaning of occupation. An experience sampling methodology study of the flow experiences of people with chronic pain in Ireland (n= >30) through electronic survey will be presented. Participants responded to a flow questionnaire (Csikszentmihalyi & Csikszentmihalyi 1988) loaded on palm pilots which were programmed (Experience Sampling Programme, Barrett & Feldman Barrett 1999) to bleep at random intervals eight times daily during waking hours over seven days. Thus the maximum completed number of questionnaires per participant was 56. Completion rates mirrored similar electronic diary studies. Results will be presented using the eight channel flow model (Massimini & Carli 1988) and interpreted with consideration of how experience is potentially mediated by chronic pain. It will be argued that these results support alternative modes of service delivery for people with chronic pain, where occupation is central to service delivery.