Title

Mothers, perceptions of their occupations and co-occupations when mothering a child with feeding concerns

Presenter Information

Kristin Winston

Start Time

26-10-2007 11:45 AM

End Time

26-10-2007 1:45 PM

Abstract

The occupations of mothering have recently gained attention in occupation-based research, however many aspects of mothering remain virtually unexplored. The purpose of this mixed methods study is to gain insight regarding mothers‚ perceptions of their occupations and co-occupations when mothering a child with feeding concerns. Data is being gathered via survey with two groups, mothers who perceive their children to be typically developing and mothers who perceive their children to have a feeding concern. In addition qualitative interviews are being conducted with 4-6 mothers from the group who perceive their children to have feeding concerns. Statistics indicate that approximately 25% of young children and up to 80% of children with developmental disabilities have some type of feeding concern (Garro, Thurman, Kerwin, & Ducette, 2005 & Manikam & Perman, 2000). Kedesdy and Budd (1998) state, no human activity has greater biological and social significance then feeding” (p. 1) thus illustrating the significant impact of this co-occupation for mothers and young children. In addition, feeding and eating for young children is typically dependent on a relationship between the child and his/her family or caregiver. Service providers and researchers who seek to understand the impact of feeding concerns from the mother’s point of view may be able to provide enhanced services or better inform the fields of occupational science and occupational therapy. Knowledge of factors that may influence the occupations and co-occupations of mothers of young children with feeding concerns will assist in the practice of occupational therapy as well as the planning of future research to meet the needs of this population. This paper will report on research currently being conducted. Quantitative data related to stress and life satisfaction in the two groups mentioned earlier in the abstract will be presented. In addition, the results of qualitative interviews gathered from a phenomenological perspective will be discussed.

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Oct 26th, 11:45 AM Oct 26th, 1:45 PM

Mothers, perceptions of their occupations and co-occupations when mothering a child with feeding concerns

The occupations of mothering have recently gained attention in occupation-based research, however many aspects of mothering remain virtually unexplored. The purpose of this mixed methods study is to gain insight regarding mothers‚ perceptions of their occupations and co-occupations when mothering a child with feeding concerns. Data is being gathered via survey with two groups, mothers who perceive their children to be typically developing and mothers who perceive their children to have a feeding concern. In addition qualitative interviews are being conducted with 4-6 mothers from the group who perceive their children to have feeding concerns. Statistics indicate that approximately 25% of young children and up to 80% of children with developmental disabilities have some type of feeding concern (Garro, Thurman, Kerwin, & Ducette, 2005 & Manikam & Perman, 2000). Kedesdy and Budd (1998) state, no human activity has greater biological and social significance then feeding” (p. 1) thus illustrating the significant impact of this co-occupation for mothers and young children. In addition, feeding and eating for young children is typically dependent on a relationship between the child and his/her family or caregiver. Service providers and researchers who seek to understand the impact of feeding concerns from the mother’s point of view may be able to provide enhanced services or better inform the fields of occupational science and occupational therapy. Knowledge of factors that may influence the occupations and co-occupations of mothers of young children with feeding concerns will assist in the practice of occupational therapy as well as the planning of future research to meet the needs of this population. This paper will report on research currently being conducted. Quantitative data related to stress and life satisfaction in the two groups mentioned earlier in the abstract will be presented. In addition, the results of qualitative interviews gathered from a phenomenological perspective will be discussed.