Title

Bullying and Sibling Exchanges

Presenter Information

Anne Cronin

Start Time

26-10-2007 10:45 AM

End Time

26-10-2007 11:45 AM

Abstract

The relationship between brothers and sisters is often the first and most intense peer relationship children experience, and it incorporates both conflict and companionship (Koontz-Lowman, 2005; Sharpe & Rossiter, 2002). Siblings act as a teacher, friend, follower, protector, enemy, rival, companion, confidant, captive audience, role model, and measuring stick (NICHCY, 1988; Poe, 2005). The permanent nature of the existence of relationship between brothers and sisters has major influence on many aspects of personal development (Cate & Loots, 2000). Inclusion, group membership and meaningful participation are all impacted by sibling occupations and sibling pair co-occupations. Bullying, the intentional tormenting of others through verbal, physical, or other methods of harassment, is a concerns in school environments. Social interactions in school environments, including bullying interactions are a common OT focus for students with autism. Families with a child with autism sometimes describe sibling interactions that resemble bullying, with the child with autism as the bullier. The same behaviors that interfere with students social exchanges in the school, interfere with social exchanges within the family. Using the theoretical lens of occupational science to consider sibling interactions in terms of occupations and co-occupations, this research study was designed to look at the interactions between sibling pairs that are typically developing as compared to matched pairs that include one sibling with autism. A focus on individual self- efficacy and measures of bullying in interactions will be included to assist in characterizing these interactions. The primary goals of the presentation are (1) to expand ways in which research, theoretical perspectives and interdisciplinary collaboration can support improved understanding of sibling influences on occupation and participation, (2) to generate discussion that will contribute to our understanding of how occupation and social participation manifests in bullying and in more supportive relationship styles, and (3) to present current findings of this research project in progress.

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Oct 26th, 10:45 AM Oct 26th, 11:45 AM

Bullying and Sibling Exchanges

The relationship between brothers and sisters is often the first and most intense peer relationship children experience, and it incorporates both conflict and companionship (Koontz-Lowman, 2005; Sharpe & Rossiter, 2002). Siblings act as a teacher, friend, follower, protector, enemy, rival, companion, confidant, captive audience, role model, and measuring stick (NICHCY, 1988; Poe, 2005). The permanent nature of the existence of relationship between brothers and sisters has major influence on many aspects of personal development (Cate & Loots, 2000). Inclusion, group membership and meaningful participation are all impacted by sibling occupations and sibling pair co-occupations. Bullying, the intentional tormenting of others through verbal, physical, or other methods of harassment, is a concerns in school environments. Social interactions in school environments, including bullying interactions are a common OT focus for students with autism. Families with a child with autism sometimes describe sibling interactions that resemble bullying, with the child with autism as the bullier. The same behaviors that interfere with students social exchanges in the school, interfere with social exchanges within the family. Using the theoretical lens of occupational science to consider sibling interactions in terms of occupations and co-occupations, this research study was designed to look at the interactions between sibling pairs that are typically developing as compared to matched pairs that include one sibling with autism. A focus on individual self- efficacy and measures of bullying in interactions will be included to assist in characterizing these interactions. The primary goals of the presentation are (1) to expand ways in which research, theoretical perspectives and interdisciplinary collaboration can support improved understanding of sibling influences on occupation and participation, (2) to generate discussion that will contribute to our understanding of how occupation and social participation manifests in bullying and in more supportive relationship styles, and (3) to present current findings of this research project in progress.