Title

Translational Research in Occupational Science: Exploring Mediating Factors in Activity-Based Intervention and Health-Related Outcomes for Older Adults

Presenter Information

Jeanne Jackson
Florence Clark

Start Time

24-10-2008 8:30 AM

End Time

24-10-2008 9:00 AM

Abstract

This paper will describe the Health Mediating Effects of the Well Elderly Study, an NIH/NIA supported clinical trial (R01 AG021108-02) investigating the efficacy of Lifestyle Redesign® for independent living older-adults. While potency of the Lifestyle Redesign® program (i.e., improving health and well-being, slowing age-related health declines, demonstrating cost effective treatment) was established in a prior NIH-funded clinical trial, the factors and processes that led to the program’s success were not explored. In this new study, we endeavored to conceptually replicate our previous research and determine mechanisms that created the intervention’s positive effects by exploring the biological, psychological and social factors that contributed to improving quality of life among elders. We hypothesized that the positive effects of the program were due to a set of interrelated mechanisms including active coping, healthy activity, perceived control and stress-related biomarkers, and social support. Using a semi-crossover design, 480 participants were randomized into two groups. Group A received the treatment for the first six months while Group B remained untreated. In the following six-month period, Group B received the treatment while Group A was untreated. An assessment battery measuring potential mediating and outcome variables was administered to all participants at baseline and at subsequent six-month intervals. In this presentation, I will discuss the purpose, design, and methodology of the project. Because this research project is in progress, the intent-to-treat analysis is not available. Baseline data will be presented to extent possible. This research contributes to the mission of SSO as it crosses the boundaries of theory and practice with occupation at the center of both. Our assessment of the theoretical mediating model will increase understanding about the mediating process events that link occupation to enhanced quality of life science?

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Oct 24th, 8:30 AM Oct 24th, 9:00 AM

Translational Research in Occupational Science: Exploring Mediating Factors in Activity-Based Intervention and Health-Related Outcomes for Older Adults

This paper will describe the Health Mediating Effects of the Well Elderly Study, an NIH/NIA supported clinical trial (R01 AG021108-02) investigating the efficacy of Lifestyle Redesign® for independent living older-adults. While potency of the Lifestyle Redesign® program (i.e., improving health and well-being, slowing age-related health declines, demonstrating cost effective treatment) was established in a prior NIH-funded clinical trial, the factors and processes that led to the program’s success were not explored. In this new study, we endeavored to conceptually replicate our previous research and determine mechanisms that created the intervention’s positive effects by exploring the biological, psychological and social factors that contributed to improving quality of life among elders. We hypothesized that the positive effects of the program were due to a set of interrelated mechanisms including active coping, healthy activity, perceived control and stress-related biomarkers, and social support. Using a semi-crossover design, 480 participants were randomized into two groups. Group A received the treatment for the first six months while Group B remained untreated. In the following six-month period, Group B received the treatment while Group A was untreated. An assessment battery measuring potential mediating and outcome variables was administered to all participants at baseline and at subsequent six-month intervals. In this presentation, I will discuss the purpose, design, and methodology of the project. Because this research project is in progress, the intent-to-treat analysis is not available. Baseline data will be presented to extent possible. This research contributes to the mission of SSO as it crosses the boundaries of theory and practice with occupation at the center of both. Our assessment of the theoretical mediating model will increase understanding about the mediating process events that link occupation to enhanced quality of life science?