Title

Social Emotional Development in Infants and Toddlers Who are Homeless as Reported by Mothers

Presenter Information

Debra Rybski

Start Time

25-10-2008 3:40 PM

End Time

25-10-2008 4:10 PM

Abstract

Children who are homeless are reported to have mental health problems at rates of 44% compared to 18% of homed children (1, 2.) A contributing factor to mental health problems can be poor social emotional development (3.) Mothers who experience homelessness may find facilitating social emotional development a challenge when basic necessities such as securing food, shelter and clothing are priorities. Children who are homeless are at risk for occupational deprivation that limits participation in occupations essential to healthy development (4.) Despite these challenges, mothers who are homeless, find ways to engage in meaningful co-occupations with their young children (5.) Little is known about social emotional development in homeless infants and toddlers. This study investigates social emotional development in children ages 3 months-3 years, as described by their mothers, who are homeless. This paper presents: 1) the frequency of social emotional concerns, 2) types of social emotional concerns, 3) enjoyable personal child characteristics, 4) enjoyable parent-child co-occupations; and finally 5) compares the concerns, enjoyment characteristics and parent-child co-occupations between infants and toddlers with and without social emotional concerns. The Ages and Stages Questionnaire: Social Emotional6 was administered to 61 mothers of children residing in a transitional living center. Descriptive statistics and qualitative coding was used to analyze the data. Results identified a higher percentage of social emotional concerns in children who were homeless as compared to homed children found in the literature1. Types of social emotional concerns included withdrawal, aggression, and eating/sleeping difficulties. Types of enjoyable child characteristics included happy, easy, quick learner, and kind. Themes of enjoyable co-occupations in typical mother-child dyads included feeding and playing, whereas themes in social emotional concerned mother-child dyads included cuddling and rocking. These results help occupational scientists to better understand the occupational development of infants and toddlers at risk for occupational deprivation; and add insight into the occupational nature of the supports and challenges that impact positive and healthy social and emotional mother-child co-occupations. This work assists occupational therapists to develop interventions in challenging natural environments that facilitate best practice with mothers and young children.

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Oct 25th, 3:40 PM Oct 25th, 4:10 PM

Social Emotional Development in Infants and Toddlers Who are Homeless as Reported by Mothers

Children who are homeless are reported to have mental health problems at rates of 44% compared to 18% of homed children (1, 2.) A contributing factor to mental health problems can be poor social emotional development (3.) Mothers who experience homelessness may find facilitating social emotional development a challenge when basic necessities such as securing food, shelter and clothing are priorities. Children who are homeless are at risk for occupational deprivation that limits participation in occupations essential to healthy development (4.) Despite these challenges, mothers who are homeless, find ways to engage in meaningful co-occupations with their young children (5.) Little is known about social emotional development in homeless infants and toddlers. This study investigates social emotional development in children ages 3 months-3 years, as described by their mothers, who are homeless. This paper presents: 1) the frequency of social emotional concerns, 2) types of social emotional concerns, 3) enjoyable personal child characteristics, 4) enjoyable parent-child co-occupations; and finally 5) compares the concerns, enjoyment characteristics and parent-child co-occupations between infants and toddlers with and without social emotional concerns. The Ages and Stages Questionnaire: Social Emotional6 was administered to 61 mothers of children residing in a transitional living center. Descriptive statistics and qualitative coding was used to analyze the data. Results identified a higher percentage of social emotional concerns in children who were homeless as compared to homed children found in the literature1. Types of social emotional concerns included withdrawal, aggression, and eating/sleeping difficulties. Types of enjoyable child characteristics included happy, easy, quick learner, and kind. Themes of enjoyable co-occupations in typical mother-child dyads included feeding and playing, whereas themes in social emotional concerned mother-child dyads included cuddling and rocking. These results help occupational scientists to better understand the occupational development of infants and toddlers at risk for occupational deprivation; and add insight into the occupational nature of the supports and challenges that impact positive and healthy social and emotional mother-child co-occupations. This work assists occupational therapists to develop interventions in challenging natural environments that facilitate best practice with mothers and young children.