Title

Living with Difference: Oral Histories of Life and Disability in Kentucky

Presenter Information

Anne Shordike
Cheryl Carrico

Start Time

24-10-2008 10:10 AM

End Time

24-10-2008 10:40 AM

Abstract

This project, funded by a grant from the Kentucky Oral History Commission, will collect and archive oral histories of persons constrained by disability from participation in society. It will be housed both with the Kentucky Historical Society and Eastern Kentucky University. For this project, disability is defined by the World Health Organization, as an umbrella term for impairments, activity limitations or participation restrictions. Persons who consider themselves disabled, or may be considered disabled by others, will share their life stories in the form of oral histories that will be made publicly accessible. As occupational therapy recognizes that narrative is one essential means for making sense of experience, this project serves both organizations and disciplines by facilitating discourse. Faculty, students and community partners are gathering these histories. Interviewers use open-ended questions to explore interviewees' life participation-what they do and have done-in relation to their experiences of disability. This project is contextualized in Kentucky's status as second-highest in the nation for population rates of disability, with nearly a quarter (22.6%) of Kentucky adults experiencing physical, mental, or emotional disability that limits activity. It is historically contextualized in society's ongoing trend toward inclusiveness in the United States, marked by the deinstitutionalization movement, the passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act, and the genesis and growth of the Independent Living Movement. As the project collects stories about participation in life in Kentucky, and how this may be impacted by disability, it will inform the historical record with the voices of those who may be constrained by disability, thus helping to mitigate the constraint. It will provide a resource for students, researchers, families, communities and any interested parties. This project, the first of its kind in the nation, will provide opportunity for understanding and discourse regarding the experience of living with disability Discussion points may include: 1. Why a partnership with occupational scientists, occupational therapists and oral historians? 2. Negotiating IRBs with a non-anonymous project 3. Challenges of design for interview guidelines inclusive for persons of many abilities and disabilities.

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Oct 24th, 10:10 AM Oct 24th, 10:40 AM

Living with Difference: Oral Histories of Life and Disability in Kentucky

This project, funded by a grant from the Kentucky Oral History Commission, will collect and archive oral histories of persons constrained by disability from participation in society. It will be housed both with the Kentucky Historical Society and Eastern Kentucky University. For this project, disability is defined by the World Health Organization, as an umbrella term for impairments, activity limitations or participation restrictions. Persons who consider themselves disabled, or may be considered disabled by others, will share their life stories in the form of oral histories that will be made publicly accessible. As occupational therapy recognizes that narrative is one essential means for making sense of experience, this project serves both organizations and disciplines by facilitating discourse. Faculty, students and community partners are gathering these histories. Interviewers use open-ended questions to explore interviewees' life participation-what they do and have done-in relation to their experiences of disability. This project is contextualized in Kentucky's status as second-highest in the nation for population rates of disability, with nearly a quarter (22.6%) of Kentucky adults experiencing physical, mental, or emotional disability that limits activity. It is historically contextualized in society's ongoing trend toward inclusiveness in the United States, marked by the deinstitutionalization movement, the passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act, and the genesis and growth of the Independent Living Movement. As the project collects stories about participation in life in Kentucky, and how this may be impacted by disability, it will inform the historical record with the voices of those who may be constrained by disability, thus helping to mitigate the constraint. It will provide a resource for students, researchers, families, communities and any interested parties. This project, the first of its kind in the nation, will provide opportunity for understanding and discourse regarding the experience of living with disability Discussion points may include: 1. Why a partnership with occupational scientists, occupational therapists and oral historians? 2. Negotiating IRBs with a non-anonymous project 3. Challenges of design for interview guidelines inclusive for persons of many abilities and disabilities.