Title

Five Meanings of Occupations in 1917: What has Changed in 90 Years?

Presenter Information

Kathlyn L. Reed

Start Time

24-10-2008 12:00 PM

End Time

24-10-2008 2:00 PM

Abstract

The intent of the paper is to compare and contrast the meaning of occupation during the past century by using selected criteria from the literature to examine the five original conditions that contributed to the development of occupational therapy literature with the five most common conditions seen today. The purpose is to explore whether significant changes have occurred in the selected criteria in relation to the meaning and application of the core ideas about occupation. The five original conditions reported in the literature from 1900-1917 were tuberculosis, mental illness and retardation, cripples (orthopedic and cardiac), war injured, and immigrants. The five most common conditions appearing in current occupational therapy literature (2000-2007) in all categories of professional literature are stroke, brain injury, cerebral palsy, dementia, and schizophrenia. Argument Occupation is a dynamic concept that has multiple meanings to persons that may change over time within a given social system, political climate, and evolving technology. If the concept is dynamic, the application may be dynamic as well. Question one: To what extent have the original meanings of occupation been maintained through the years? Question two: If changes have occurred, are the changes significant (lost, added, reformulated) to theory and application in occupational science and therapy? Methodology included describing the conditions and contexts, summarizing the problems persons faced in daily life, dictionary definition of occupation, meaning of occupation both positive and negative, and solutions (strategies, media and methods) adopted within occupational therapy practice. The context, problems, definitions, meaning of occupation, and solutions were then compared to present situations as identified in the literature. Conclusions: Changes can be documented in the conditions, contexts, problems, definitions, meanings, and solutions between the time period associated with the developmental years of the profession and the current time period. These changes will be reported. The significance of the changes to the meaning of occupation, effect on occupational science, and application to occupational therapy practice will be put to audience for discussion. This proposal fits with the mission "to explore and expand the knowledge of occupation."

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Oct 24th, 12:00 PM Oct 24th, 2:00 PM

Five Meanings of Occupations in 1917: What has Changed in 90 Years?

The intent of the paper is to compare and contrast the meaning of occupation during the past century by using selected criteria from the literature to examine the five original conditions that contributed to the development of occupational therapy literature with the five most common conditions seen today. The purpose is to explore whether significant changes have occurred in the selected criteria in relation to the meaning and application of the core ideas about occupation. The five original conditions reported in the literature from 1900-1917 were tuberculosis, mental illness and retardation, cripples (orthopedic and cardiac), war injured, and immigrants. The five most common conditions appearing in current occupational therapy literature (2000-2007) in all categories of professional literature are stroke, brain injury, cerebral palsy, dementia, and schizophrenia. Argument Occupation is a dynamic concept that has multiple meanings to persons that may change over time within a given social system, political climate, and evolving technology. If the concept is dynamic, the application may be dynamic as well. Question one: To what extent have the original meanings of occupation been maintained through the years? Question two: If changes have occurred, are the changes significant (lost, added, reformulated) to theory and application in occupational science and therapy? Methodology included describing the conditions and contexts, summarizing the problems persons faced in daily life, dictionary definition of occupation, meaning of occupation both positive and negative, and solutions (strategies, media and methods) adopted within occupational therapy practice. The context, problems, definitions, meaning of occupation, and solutions were then compared to present situations as identified in the literature. Conclusions: Changes can be documented in the conditions, contexts, problems, definitions, meanings, and solutions between the time period associated with the developmental years of the profession and the current time period. These changes will be reported. The significance of the changes to the meaning of occupation, effect on occupational science, and application to occupational therapy practice will be put to audience for discussion. This proposal fits with the mission "to explore and expand the knowledge of occupation."