Title

Preventive Home Visits for At-risk Older Adults Living in the Community

Start Time

24-10-2008 9:10 AM

End Time

24-10-2008 9:40 AM

Abstract

Aging in place is now recognized as a goal of most older adults. The search for preventive methods to mitigate decline and unwanted moves from home and community is important. One such method, Preventive Home Visits (PHVs), has been utilized in parts of Europe for approximately two decades. The PHV model is based on infrequent but regular visits to an older adult's home by a trained practitioner (typically an occupational therapist or nurse). The visit is designed to assess the older person's situation and provide information and advice to optimize function and well-being. Evidence about PHV efficacy is mixed but generally supportive, and there is a distinct need to create and examine a preventive nonmedical intervention model in the USA. A successfully developed and implemented approach could enhance lives and save costs. This poster communicates the development and implementation of an occupation-based PHV intervention. The PHV intervention (funded by the NIA) is being conducted in several North Carolina counties and will be evaluated to assess its feasibility and effects for a larger trial. The study is using an experimental, repeated measures design in which approximately 120 older (75+ years) community-dwelling adults who are at-risk for functional decline are randomly assigned to experimental and comparison groups. The experimental group receives the PHV intervention four times across a 12-month period. The comparison group receives a minimal intervention of two informational phone calls and printed materials about local services during the same period. An occupational therapist with the requisite training and experience in home-based evaluation and intervention is conducting the experimental intervention. We are independently administering a set of standardized outcome measures to both groups immediately pre-intervention, and again at regular intervals after each intervention. The outcome measures will cover the primary dimensions on which we hypothesize PHVs will have a positive influence: functional ability, participation, life satisfaction, depression, general health, and care utilization. Analyses will compare the differences in outcomes for the two groups as well as assess several dimensions of intervention feasibility. These data will be the basis for a subsequent, enhanced intervention and study.

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Oct 24th, 9:10 AM Oct 24th, 9:40 AM

Preventive Home Visits for At-risk Older Adults Living in the Community

Aging in place is now recognized as a goal of most older adults. The search for preventive methods to mitigate decline and unwanted moves from home and community is important. One such method, Preventive Home Visits (PHVs), has been utilized in parts of Europe for approximately two decades. The PHV model is based on infrequent but regular visits to an older adult's home by a trained practitioner (typically an occupational therapist or nurse). The visit is designed to assess the older person's situation and provide information and advice to optimize function and well-being. Evidence about PHV efficacy is mixed but generally supportive, and there is a distinct need to create and examine a preventive nonmedical intervention model in the USA. A successfully developed and implemented approach could enhance lives and save costs. This poster communicates the development and implementation of an occupation-based PHV intervention. The PHV intervention (funded by the NIA) is being conducted in several North Carolina counties and will be evaluated to assess its feasibility and effects for a larger trial. The study is using an experimental, repeated measures design in which approximately 120 older (75+ years) community-dwelling adults who are at-risk for functional decline are randomly assigned to experimental and comparison groups. The experimental group receives the PHV intervention four times across a 12-month period. The comparison group receives a minimal intervention of two informational phone calls and printed materials about local services during the same period. An occupational therapist with the requisite training and experience in home-based evaluation and intervention is conducting the experimental intervention. We are independently administering a set of standardized outcome measures to both groups immediately pre-intervention, and again at regular intervals after each intervention. The outcome measures will cover the primary dimensions on which we hypothesize PHVs will have a positive influence: functional ability, participation, life satisfaction, depression, general health, and care utilization. Analyses will compare the differences in outcomes for the two groups as well as assess several dimensions of intervention feasibility. These data will be the basis for a subsequent, enhanced intervention and study.