Title

Transition to a CCRC: The Role of Occupation in the Therapeutic Landscape Process

Start Time

24-10-2008 10:50 AM

End Time

24-10-2008 11:20 AM

Abstract

Residential transitions of older adults are increasingly studied in the gerontological literature. While various perspectives have been brought to bear on the transition process, the concept of therapeutic landscape, along with attention to occupational patterns and shifts, can add important insights to that literature. Although underutilized in gerontology, therapeutic landscape offers a combination of geographical and cultural views on the place and wellbeing relationship. In our extension of recent work on the concept, the care environment presents a therapeutic landscape encounter with which the older adult must transact and adjust. The inclusion of an occupational science perspective, wherein occupations are seen as a crucial part of the person-place relationship, can further enhance the therapeutic landscape perspective of older persons and their retirement communities. To provide evidence for those claims, we present a case study analysis that attempts to combine these perspectives and examine the role of occupation in the lives of older people who moved to a Continuing Care Retirement Community (CCRC). 116 movers completed pre- and post-move questionnaires about their levels of engagement in 20 activities. Frequency distributions, paired t-tests, and logistic regression analyses performed on the data indicate that while overall levels of activity did not change from pre- to post-move, patterns of engagement did change as a result of the move to the CCRC. Occupations that declined post-move were mostly individual occupations, and those that increased were predominantly social. Moreover, total activity engagement after the move was associated with residential satisfaction in the CCRC. Even with their limitations, the data and analytical findings suggest that occupations are an important part of the CCRC therapeutic landscape process. The nature of shifts in occupational patterns, and the types of occupations of which they consist, offer new information about older adults' residential transitions. The results reflect person-place transactions, and further exploration of occupational changes after such a move may help explain how CCRCs can work better to benefit older adults' occupations and well-being.

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Oct 24th, 10:50 AM Oct 24th, 11:20 AM

Transition to a CCRC: The Role of Occupation in the Therapeutic Landscape Process

Residential transitions of older adults are increasingly studied in the gerontological literature. While various perspectives have been brought to bear on the transition process, the concept of therapeutic landscape, along with attention to occupational patterns and shifts, can add important insights to that literature. Although underutilized in gerontology, therapeutic landscape offers a combination of geographical and cultural views on the place and wellbeing relationship. In our extension of recent work on the concept, the care environment presents a therapeutic landscape encounter with which the older adult must transact and adjust. The inclusion of an occupational science perspective, wherein occupations are seen as a crucial part of the person-place relationship, can further enhance the therapeutic landscape perspective of older persons and their retirement communities. To provide evidence for those claims, we present a case study analysis that attempts to combine these perspectives and examine the role of occupation in the lives of older people who moved to a Continuing Care Retirement Community (CCRC). 116 movers completed pre- and post-move questionnaires about their levels of engagement in 20 activities. Frequency distributions, paired t-tests, and logistic regression analyses performed on the data indicate that while overall levels of activity did not change from pre- to post-move, patterns of engagement did change as a result of the move to the CCRC. Occupations that declined post-move were mostly individual occupations, and those that increased were predominantly social. Moreover, total activity engagement after the move was associated with residential satisfaction in the CCRC. Even with their limitations, the data and analytical findings suggest that occupations are an important part of the CCRC therapeutic landscape process. The nature of shifts in occupational patterns, and the types of occupations of which they consist, offer new information about older adults' residential transitions. The results reflect person-place transactions, and further exploration of occupational changes after such a move may help explain how CCRCs can work better to benefit older adults' occupations and well-being.