Title

Co-occupation Versus Supportive Social Environment

Start Time

14-10-2009 7:00 PM

End Time

14-10-2009 9:00 PM

Abstract

Co-occupation is a term that has been around almost as long as the discipline of occupational science, but it is infrequently used in the literature. Co-occupation occurs when two or more people mutually engage in occupation. All people engage in co-occupation, but certain populations, such as individuals with significant disabilities, may require co-occupation in order to have access to occupation. The literature often refers to this need as a supportive social environment. As a relatively new researcher working with populations with cognitive and communication impairments, I see the benefit of having a term that describes how these individuals engage in occupation with others. Through this presentation, I would like to invite other viewpoints about the usefulness of this term. The purpose of this session is to prompt a discussion about the value of the construct of co-occupation versus a supportive social environment. Is co-occupation just another term that we can sufficiently portray through a discussion of a person-environment interaction? Is there value in using the term “co-occupation” to describe how individuals engage in occupation, especially individuals such as children and those with certain types of disabilities who need others to engage with them in order to participate? The presentation will briefly review the findings from a study that used cooccupation to express engagement and another that depicted a supportive social environment as the means to enable participation. The audience will be invited to participate in discussion about whether the use of the term “co-occupation” adds clarity or unnecessary verbiage to the study of occupation and occupational engagement.

References

Mahoney, W. & Roberts, E. (2008). Co-occupation in a day program for adults with developmental disabilities. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Nyman, A., & Lund, M. (2007). Influences of the social environment on engagement in occupations: The experience of persons with rheumatoid arthritis. Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, 14, 63-72. DOI: 10.1080/11038120601124562

Pierce, D. (2003). Occupation by design: Building therapeutic power. Philadelphia: F. A. Davis.

Pizur-Barnekow, K. & Jacques, N. (2008). Introduction to occupation and cooccupation. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Zemke, R. & Clark, F. (1996). Co-occupations of mothers and children. In R. Zemke & F. Clark (Eds.), Occupational science: The evolving discipline (pp. 213-215). Philadelphia: F. A. Davis.

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Oct 14th, 7:00 PM Oct 14th, 9:00 PM

Co-occupation Versus Supportive Social Environment

Co-occupation is a term that has been around almost as long as the discipline of occupational science, but it is infrequently used in the literature. Co-occupation occurs when two or more people mutually engage in occupation. All people engage in co-occupation, but certain populations, such as individuals with significant disabilities, may require co-occupation in order to have access to occupation. The literature often refers to this need as a supportive social environment. As a relatively new researcher working with populations with cognitive and communication impairments, I see the benefit of having a term that describes how these individuals engage in occupation with others. Through this presentation, I would like to invite other viewpoints about the usefulness of this term. The purpose of this session is to prompt a discussion about the value of the construct of co-occupation versus a supportive social environment. Is co-occupation just another term that we can sufficiently portray through a discussion of a person-environment interaction? Is there value in using the term “co-occupation” to describe how individuals engage in occupation, especially individuals such as children and those with certain types of disabilities who need others to engage with them in order to participate? The presentation will briefly review the findings from a study that used cooccupation to express engagement and another that depicted a supportive social environment as the means to enable participation. The audience will be invited to participate in discussion about whether the use of the term “co-occupation” adds clarity or unnecessary verbiage to the study of occupation and occupational engagement.