Title

Throwing Breaches for Social Participation: The Embodied Pleasures of Rhythm and Its Disruption for a Healing of Belonging for Children with Autism in a Sensory Integration-Based Clinic

Start Time

15-10-2009 2:00 PM

End Time

15-10-2009 3:30 PM

Abstract

The study of occupations related to well-being requires research methods that capture transformative processes that extend beyond discrete changes in sensory-motor or psychosocial terms. Determinations of therapeutic efficacy, particularly modes of being with that include future participation in social worlds, must be able trace how bodily sensing transformations lead to a healing of belonging; that is, experiences of being a fully recognized by others. The intent of this paper is to propose how an “aesthetic frame” can be used to trace and make visible how the simple pleasures of mundane interactions lead to participation in larger social worlds. Occupational science is situated between the disciplines of biomedicine and social sciences and, thus, between what Kenneth Burke called terministic screens—or sets of terms—that permit one way of seeing while occluding others. Drawing from an ethnography of the “gaps between” children with autism and therapists, this paper tacks back-and-forth between biomedical-positivist and literary-philosophical terms to render visible the aesthetics ofbodily-sensing and imaginative practices central to cultural forms of beauty. Using an aesthetic frame, then, a microanalysis of bodily-sensing actions reveals how children and adults alike throw breaches—creating forms of rhythm and its disruptions—that lead to the emergence of, what I am calling, embodied pleasures. The emergence of embodied pleasure marks moments of heightened intersubjectivity. Such moments of heightened intersubjectivity, in turn, lead to the integration of novel postural stances of self-in-relation-to-other (blowing bubbles for a baby, caresses, familial tussling) with particular moral stances of how--be-with-others. Pinpointing moments of rhythmic disruption can also bracket the rich complexity of how the type of bodily sensing transformation can be traced to experiences of social participation and a healing of belonging that can extend outside the clinical context. Occupational science must find a language that can bridge the key antimonies created between disciplines. A both-and integration of disciplinary terms accentuates the at-stakeness of utilizing research methods that can make visible and bridge both (1) changes of bodily and psychosocial components as measures of biomedical efficacy and (2) transformations in moral experiences as central to healing of belonging to larger communities.

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Oct 15th, 2:00 PM Oct 15th, 3:30 PM

Throwing Breaches for Social Participation: The Embodied Pleasures of Rhythm and Its Disruption for a Healing of Belonging for Children with Autism in a Sensory Integration-Based Clinic

The study of occupations related to well-being requires research methods that capture transformative processes that extend beyond discrete changes in sensory-motor or psychosocial terms. Determinations of therapeutic efficacy, particularly modes of being with that include future participation in social worlds, must be able trace how bodily sensing transformations lead to a healing of belonging; that is, experiences of being a fully recognized by others. The intent of this paper is to propose how an “aesthetic frame” can be used to trace and make visible how the simple pleasures of mundane interactions lead to participation in larger social worlds. Occupational science is situated between the disciplines of biomedicine and social sciences and, thus, between what Kenneth Burke called terministic screens—or sets of terms—that permit one way of seeing while occluding others. Drawing from an ethnography of the “gaps between” children with autism and therapists, this paper tacks back-and-forth between biomedical-positivist and literary-philosophical terms to render visible the aesthetics ofbodily-sensing and imaginative practices central to cultural forms of beauty. Using an aesthetic frame, then, a microanalysis of bodily-sensing actions reveals how children and adults alike throw breaches—creating forms of rhythm and its disruptions—that lead to the emergence of, what I am calling, embodied pleasures. The emergence of embodied pleasure marks moments of heightened intersubjectivity. Such moments of heightened intersubjectivity, in turn, lead to the integration of novel postural stances of self-in-relation-to-other (blowing bubbles for a baby, caresses, familial tussling) with particular moral stances of how--be-with-others. Pinpointing moments of rhythmic disruption can also bracket the rich complexity of how the type of bodily sensing transformation can be traced to experiences of social participation and a healing of belonging that can extend outside the clinical context. Occupational science must find a language that can bridge the key antimonies created between disciplines. A both-and integration of disciplinary terms accentuates the at-stakeness of utilizing research methods that can make visible and bridge both (1) changes of bodily and psychosocial components as measures of biomedical efficacy and (2) transformations in moral experiences as central to healing of belonging to larger communities.