Title

Occupational Analysis of a Sabbatical

Start Time

14-10-2009 7:00 PM

End Time

14-10-2009 9:00 PM

Abstract

Sabbaticals have a long history in the academy. While the benefits of a period of reflection or engagement in research with no other work distractions is the understood purpose of a sabbatical, other benefits to the individual and her or his community of scholars may surface. These outcomes can be richer when international travel and dialogue are part of the sabbatical experience. In this research poster, a reflective self-analysis of a sabbatical experience through an occupation-focused lens will be shared. Two independent analyses will be presented. For the first analysis, the American Occupational Therapy Practice Framework is used to report the similarities and differences in the occupational engagement patterns of a teacher-scholar when in the United States to those patterns while at a host institution in the United Kingdom. The second analysis is a comparison of the projected research goals and the actual outcomes. The analysis of the semester-long sabbatical was conducted by reviewing personal emails and journal entries, photographs, and personal communication. The results will be shared through comparison tables and photographs, as well as journal and email excerpts. A digital photo frame will also be used to assist in telling the story of the sabbatical journey. Occupational scientists, with their deep appreciation of meaningful occupations, are well situated to study, reflect, and participate in discussions of the purpose and relevance of the academic life. Since a legacy plan is needed in order to fill the ranks of the academy as its current member retire, this type of research can assist the newest members in their adjustment to this new life. It also assists in their career and research plan development decision-making.

References

American Occupational Therapy Association. (2008). Occupational therapy practice framework: Domain and process. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 62, 625-683. DOI: 10.5014/ajot.62.6.625

Frost, P., & Taylor, S. (1996). Rhythms of academic Life. Personal accounts of careers in academia. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Pierce, D. (1986). The work of scholars. In R. Zemke & F. Clark (Eds.) Occupational science: The Evolving Discipline (pp. 125-141). Philadelphia: F. A. Davis.

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Oct 14th, 7:00 PM Oct 14th, 9:00 PM

Occupational Analysis of a Sabbatical

Sabbaticals have a long history in the academy. While the benefits of a period of reflection or engagement in research with no other work distractions is the understood purpose of a sabbatical, other benefits to the individual and her or his community of scholars may surface. These outcomes can be richer when international travel and dialogue are part of the sabbatical experience. In this research poster, a reflective self-analysis of a sabbatical experience through an occupation-focused lens will be shared. Two independent analyses will be presented. For the first analysis, the American Occupational Therapy Practice Framework is used to report the similarities and differences in the occupational engagement patterns of a teacher-scholar when in the United States to those patterns while at a host institution in the United Kingdom. The second analysis is a comparison of the projected research goals and the actual outcomes. The analysis of the semester-long sabbatical was conducted by reviewing personal emails and journal entries, photographs, and personal communication. The results will be shared through comparison tables and photographs, as well as journal and email excerpts. A digital photo frame will also be used to assist in telling the story of the sabbatical journey. Occupational scientists, with their deep appreciation of meaningful occupations, are well situated to study, reflect, and participate in discussions of the purpose and relevance of the academic life. Since a legacy plan is needed in order to fill the ranks of the academy as its current member retire, this type of research can assist the newest members in their adjustment to this new life. It also assists in their career and research plan development decision-making.