Title

Capturing the Subjective Experience of Daily Life: A Developing Assessment

Start Time

14-10-2009 7:00 PM

End Time

14-10-2009 9:00 PM

Abstract

The relationship between occupation and health is multi-faceted and complex. Developing new ways of assessing individuals’ experiences with daily life will help us learn more about the occupational nature of humans and the interrelationship with health. Not only is occupation a subjective experience, but how one balances occupations over time is also subjective, and cannot be defined by an outsider. The PPR Profile: Daily Experiences of Pleasure, Productivity and Restoration, currently being developed, provides individuals the opportunity to identify the blend of pleasure, productivity, and restoration that occurs in their daily occupations, thus beginning to uncover a more complex view of occupation. These three essential characteristics are considered to be innate biological needs that are met through engaging in daily life. Pre-testing of the PPR Profile not only began to validate the use of the three characteristics but assisted with clarifications of instructions and the rating scale. The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate some of the psychometric properties when administered to a normal adult population, and begin to examine the relationship between patterns of pleasure, productivity and restoration with one’s activities, health and well-being. Following approval from the institution’s human subject review committee, 40- 50 adults, responsible for planning and orchestrating their own daily activities were recruited. Each completed a demographic survey with questions related to health, the Ryff’s Psychological Well-Being instrument and were given instructions for recording his/her daily activities and experiences for a 24 hour period of time using the PPR Profile. A semi-structured interview followed gathering feedback about the use and value of the PPR Profile. Preliminary data analyses are in process (using descriptive and correlational statistics). Anticipated results to be reported include measures of reliability and validity, along with quantitative (examining the relationship between patterns of pleasure, productivity and restoration and one’s activities, psychological well-being and health) and qualitative results (visual displays of patterns of pleasure, productivity and restoration). Future steps in the assessment development process will be identified, and implications for use in research and practice discussed.

References

Backman, C. (2005). Occupational balance: Measuring time use and satisfaction across occupational performance areas. In M. Law, W. Dunn & C. Baum (Eds.), Measuring occupational performance: Supporting best practice in occupational therapy (pp. 287-298). Thorofare, NJ: Slack.

Coster, W. (2006). The road forward to better measures for practice and research. Occupational Therapy Journal of Research, 26 (4), 131. Access Article

Doble, S., & Santha, J.C. (2008). Occupational well-being: Rethinking occupational therapy outcomes. Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy, 75(3), 184-190. Article Access

Matuska, K. M. & Christiansen, C. H. (2008). A proposed model of lifestyle balance. Journal of Occupational Science, 15(1), 9-19. Access Article

Pierce, D. (2003). Occupation by design: Building therapeutic power. Philadelphia: F.A. Davis Company.

Wilcock, A. (1998). Occupation for health. British Journal of Occupational Therapy, 61(8), 340-345. Article Access

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Oct 14th, 7:00 PM Oct 14th, 9:00 PM

Capturing the Subjective Experience of Daily Life: A Developing Assessment

The relationship between occupation and health is multi-faceted and complex. Developing new ways of assessing individuals’ experiences with daily life will help us learn more about the occupational nature of humans and the interrelationship with health. Not only is occupation a subjective experience, but how one balances occupations over time is also subjective, and cannot be defined by an outsider. The PPR Profile: Daily Experiences of Pleasure, Productivity and Restoration, currently being developed, provides individuals the opportunity to identify the blend of pleasure, productivity, and restoration that occurs in their daily occupations, thus beginning to uncover a more complex view of occupation. These three essential characteristics are considered to be innate biological needs that are met through engaging in daily life. Pre-testing of the PPR Profile not only began to validate the use of the three characteristics but assisted with clarifications of instructions and the rating scale. The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate some of the psychometric properties when administered to a normal adult population, and begin to examine the relationship between patterns of pleasure, productivity and restoration with one’s activities, health and well-being. Following approval from the institution’s human subject review committee, 40- 50 adults, responsible for planning and orchestrating their own daily activities were recruited. Each completed a demographic survey with questions related to health, the Ryff’s Psychological Well-Being instrument and were given instructions for recording his/her daily activities and experiences for a 24 hour period of time using the PPR Profile. A semi-structured interview followed gathering feedback about the use and value of the PPR Profile. Preliminary data analyses are in process (using descriptive and correlational statistics). Anticipated results to be reported include measures of reliability and validity, along with quantitative (examining the relationship between patterns of pleasure, productivity and restoration and one’s activities, psychological well-being and health) and qualitative results (visual displays of patterns of pleasure, productivity and restoration). Future steps in the assessment development process will be identified, and implications for use in research and practice discussed.