Title

The Activity Setting of Home Treatment Program: Understanding the Challenges of Successfully Embedding Home Treatment Programs in Ecocultural Niches

Start Time

14-10-2009 7:00 PM

End Time

14-10-2009 9:00 PM

Abstract

In this presentation, I use ecocultural theory to understand the challenges in occupational therapy of assigning home treatment programs to parents of children with disabilities. This paper presents a secondary data analysis of studies by the author exploring parental strategies of integrating a structured home treatment program and children’s homework, respectively, into the family’s routines. The analysis revealed that families usually find ways to include homework in their daily routines, but much less often home treatment programs. This difference may be explained by parental values—including a belief that failure to complete homework will lead to negative consequences for their children at school. But in home treatment we see that parents adapt the occupational therapy-prescribed program to fit their activity setting and, if the adaptations are too difficult, they allow the home treatment program to lapse. This hierarchy of values frustrates occupational therapists’ effort to engage families in home programs that may actually enhance their children’s ability to function effectively in school and future work environments. Although ecocultural theory is useful framework to understand this phenomenon, occupational scientists are challenged to build on this theory to include aspects such as the person’s function and structure and adaptive equipment to make it more useful for occupational therapists.

References

Gallimore, R., Coots, J., Weiser, T., Garnier, H., & Guthrie, D. (1996).Family responses to children with early developmental delays II: Accommodation intensity and activity in early and middle childhood. American Journal on Mental Retardation, 101, 215-232.

Gallimore, R., Weisner, T. S., Bernheimer, L. P., Guthrie, D., & Nihira, K. (1993). Family responses to young children with developmental delays: Accommodation activity in ecological and cultural context. American Journal on Mental Retardation, 98, 185-206.

Gallimore, R., Weisner, T. S., Kaufman, S. Z., & Bernheimer, L. P. (1989). The social construction of ecocultural niches: Family accommodation of developmentally delayed children. American Journal on Mental Retardation, 94, 216-230.

Segal, R., & Beyer, C. (2006). Issues in the integration and application of a home treatment program: A study of parents and occupational therapists. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 60(5), 500 – 510. DOI: 10.5014/ajot.60.5.500

Segal, R., & Hinojosa, J. (2006). The activity setting of homework: An analysis of three cases and implications for occupational therapy. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 60(1), 50 – 59. DOI: 10.5014/ajot.60.1.50

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Oct 14th, 7:00 PM Oct 14th, 9:00 PM

The Activity Setting of Home Treatment Program: Understanding the Challenges of Successfully Embedding Home Treatment Programs in Ecocultural Niches

In this presentation, I use ecocultural theory to understand the challenges in occupational therapy of assigning home treatment programs to parents of children with disabilities. This paper presents a secondary data analysis of studies by the author exploring parental strategies of integrating a structured home treatment program and children’s homework, respectively, into the family’s routines. The analysis revealed that families usually find ways to include homework in their daily routines, but much less often home treatment programs. This difference may be explained by parental values—including a belief that failure to complete homework will lead to negative consequences for their children at school. But in home treatment we see that parents adapt the occupational therapy-prescribed program to fit their activity setting and, if the adaptations are too difficult, they allow the home treatment program to lapse. This hierarchy of values frustrates occupational therapists’ effort to engage families in home programs that may actually enhance their children’s ability to function effectively in school and future work environments. Although ecocultural theory is useful framework to understand this phenomenon, occupational scientists are challenged to build on this theory to include aspects such as the person’s function and structure and adaptive equipment to make it more useful for occupational therapists.