Title

Benefits of a Sequential Mixed Model Design to Understand the Impact of Driving Cessation on Seniors’ Occupational Participation

Start Time

15-10-2009 3:45 PM

End Time

15-10-2009 5:15 PM

Abstract

Intent: The process and findings of a research project on driving cessation in urban and rural seniors will be used to illustrate and discuss the benefits of a sequential mixed model design for understanding occupational adaptation. Argument: According to Tashakkori and Teddlie (1998) in sequential mixed-model approaches, conclusions made following the result of the first phase of a research project are used to design the next study, often to explore unexpected results. This approach is proposed here as a useful one in occupational science. While a common process in building a conceptual framework consists of initially conducting inductive qualitative research, it will be argued that an initial quantitative phase may in some cases be more fruitful. As an illustration, the pattern of results of the quantitative strand of our project informed the development of relevant questions which then could be elucidated through the collection and analysis of phenomenological data. The first phase of our research allowed us to uncover the unexpected quantitative result that rural seniors didn’t seem to experience as great a decline in occupational participation and quality of life as urban participants. Those initial results guided the design of the qualitative strand of the project in which extensive interviews were conducted with 25 urban and rural seniors allowing us to shed light on the rich and complex reasons for that pattern of results. Importance to Occupational Science. Occupational science has been developed in part for the purpose of contributing to the theoretical basis of occupational therapy (Clark, 2006). Occupational therapists are increasingly involved in helping seniors with transition to other modes of community mobility and are in need of conceptual frameworks supporting that emerging practice area. In addition to helping develop a framework, a sequential mixed model study can point to areas worth prioritizing, help with a client centered approach, as well as lead to the most relevant further research questions. Conclusions: While qualitative approaches have been strongly favored by occupational scientists (Cook, 2001, Molke et al, 2004), there are clear benefits for both theory building and practice to using a sequential mixed-model design and to start by a quantitative approach.

References

Clark, F. (2006) One person’s thoughts on the future of occupational science. Journal of Occupational Science, 13(3), 167-179. Access Article

Cook, J. V. (2001). Qualitative research in occupational therapy: Strategies and Experiences. Albany, NY: Delmar.

Molke, D. K., Laliberte-Rudman, D., Polatajko, H. J. (2004) The promise of occupational science: A developmental assessment of an emerging academic discipline. Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy, 71(5), 269-280. Access Article

Tashakkori , A. and Teddlie, C. B. (1998). Mixed methodology: Combining qualitative and quantitative approaches. Thousand Oaks, California: Sage Publications.

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Oct 15th, 3:45 PM Oct 15th, 5:15 PM

Benefits of a Sequential Mixed Model Design to Understand the Impact of Driving Cessation on Seniors’ Occupational Participation

Intent: The process and findings of a research project on driving cessation in urban and rural seniors will be used to illustrate and discuss the benefits of a sequential mixed model design for understanding occupational adaptation. Argument: According to Tashakkori and Teddlie (1998) in sequential mixed-model approaches, conclusions made following the result of the first phase of a research project are used to design the next study, often to explore unexpected results. This approach is proposed here as a useful one in occupational science. While a common process in building a conceptual framework consists of initially conducting inductive qualitative research, it will be argued that an initial quantitative phase may in some cases be more fruitful. As an illustration, the pattern of results of the quantitative strand of our project informed the development of relevant questions which then could be elucidated through the collection and analysis of phenomenological data. The first phase of our research allowed us to uncover the unexpected quantitative result that rural seniors didn’t seem to experience as great a decline in occupational participation and quality of life as urban participants. Those initial results guided the design of the qualitative strand of the project in which extensive interviews were conducted with 25 urban and rural seniors allowing us to shed light on the rich and complex reasons for that pattern of results. Importance to Occupational Science. Occupational science has been developed in part for the purpose of contributing to the theoretical basis of occupational therapy (Clark, 2006). Occupational therapists are increasingly involved in helping seniors with transition to other modes of community mobility and are in need of conceptual frameworks supporting that emerging practice area. In addition to helping develop a framework, a sequential mixed model study can point to areas worth prioritizing, help with a client centered approach, as well as lead to the most relevant further research questions. Conclusions: While qualitative approaches have been strongly favored by occupational scientists (Cook, 2001, Molke et al, 2004), there are clear benefits for both theory building and practice to using a sequential mixed-model design and to start by a quantitative approach.