Title

Framework Analysis: A Helpful Link Between Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy?

Start Time

16-10-2009 3:30 PM

End Time

16-10-2009 5:00 PM

Abstract

Intent: The qualitative analysis method called Framework Analysis will be presented and the case will be made, using illustrations from occupational science research conducted using that methodology, that this could be a fruitful link between occupational science and occupational therapy practice. Argument. Framework Analysis is a method originally developed in the context of applied policy research by Ritchie and Spencer (1994). It has been further refined by Lacey and Luff (2001) and has been gaining popularity in British health care research because it offers a more targeted way of conducting qualitative analysis that is useful for practice. This approach consists of five linear stages, namely Familiarization, Identifying Thematic Framework, Indexing, and finally Mapping and Interpretation. One of the main differences with other data analysis techniques such as Grounded Theory is that it explicitly incorporates apriori concepts from existing frameworks with concepts emerging from the data in the development of the Thematic Framework. It also does not require data saturation and is linear rather than iterative. In the studies we conducted that will be presented as illustration, the Thematic Framework was developed through a combination of concepts from the occupational science perspective, the occupational therapy literature as well as those emerging from the data. This allowed us to hone on what participants were saying about key concepts of interest to the field and relevant for practice, along with identifying new ideas that had not been previously discussed. The fact that it does not require data saturation and follows systematic and clear stages also makes it a more manageable technique for Masters’ students and future occupational therapists. Importance to Occupational Science: Due to the fact that occupational science helps develop the theoretical basis of occupational therapy, framework analysis offers the potential of making the link more direct and relevant. The clear stages also make it clear how the results were arrived at from the data. Conclusion: This presentation provides support for Lacey and Luff’s statement that Framework Analysis works well in the context of research which seeks to arrive at data-driven recommendations often within a limited time frame.

References

Lacey, A. & Luff, D. (2001). Trent Focus for Research and Development in Primary Health Care: An Introduction to Qualitative Analysis. Trent Focus.

Richie, J. and Spencer, L (1994). Qualitative data analysis for applied policy research. In Bryman and Burgess (eds.), Analysing Qualitative Data. London: Routledge, p. 173-194.

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Oct 16th, 3:30 PM Oct 16th, 5:00 PM

Framework Analysis: A Helpful Link Between Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy?

Intent: The qualitative analysis method called Framework Analysis will be presented and the case will be made, using illustrations from occupational science research conducted using that methodology, that this could be a fruitful link between occupational science and occupational therapy practice. Argument. Framework Analysis is a method originally developed in the context of applied policy research by Ritchie and Spencer (1994). It has been further refined by Lacey and Luff (2001) and has been gaining popularity in British health care research because it offers a more targeted way of conducting qualitative analysis that is useful for practice. This approach consists of five linear stages, namely Familiarization, Identifying Thematic Framework, Indexing, and finally Mapping and Interpretation. One of the main differences with other data analysis techniques such as Grounded Theory is that it explicitly incorporates apriori concepts from existing frameworks with concepts emerging from the data in the development of the Thematic Framework. It also does not require data saturation and is linear rather than iterative. In the studies we conducted that will be presented as illustration, the Thematic Framework was developed through a combination of concepts from the occupational science perspective, the occupational therapy literature as well as those emerging from the data. This allowed us to hone on what participants were saying about key concepts of interest to the field and relevant for practice, along with identifying new ideas that had not been previously discussed. The fact that it does not require data saturation and follows systematic and clear stages also makes it a more manageable technique for Masters’ students and future occupational therapists. Importance to Occupational Science: Due to the fact that occupational science helps develop the theoretical basis of occupational therapy, framework analysis offers the potential of making the link more direct and relevant. The clear stages also make it clear how the results were arrived at from the data. Conclusion: This presentation provides support for Lacey and Luff’s statement that Framework Analysis works well in the context of research which seeks to arrive at data-driven recommendations often within a limited time frame.