Title

Use of occupational science to advance the study of senior’s use of technology in safe driving

Start Time

21-10-2011 1:00 PM

End Time

21-10-2011 1:30 PM

Session Type

Event

Abstract

In today’s society, driving is often seen as a means toward an end rather than a meaningful occupation. The use of after-market technology by seniors is recommended to enhance safe use of the private vehicle. While there is great interest in the topic of seniors and driving there is limited research specific to senior’s use of after-market technology related to the continuous and safe use of a private vehicle. This knowledge is needed to assist the growing population of senior drivers and passengers to continuously enable participation in the occupation of driving, and to inform driver training programs for seniors.

Thus, as a starting point a scoping review was conducted (Arskey and O’Malley, 2005). Research papers published in English were selected according to relevancy rather than quality criteria. Official reports referred to in the papers were tracked back and included if relevant.

Literature mapping (e.g. year of publication, source and characteristic of text, disciplinary background of authors) and concept mapping was performed (Rumrill, Fitzgerald, & Merchant, 2010). Concepts were mapped using an occupational perspective informed by the work of the HAAT model (Cook and Polgar 2008), Person-Object Model (Hocking 1997), and the meaning (Persson et al., 2001) of driving. Literature mapping revealed that the knowledge is largely informed from three fields of studies: the disability literature on adaptive technologies; the aging literature on the functional losses and deficits of individuals; and the human factors and design literature. The conceptual mapping exercise informed by our occupational perspective helped to frame the numerous key concepts/attributes in the literature about technology use by seniors such as intuitiveness, redundancy of information and tolerance to error, adaptability, and flexibility, as well the models underscored the need for research that evaluates the usability and compatibility of technologies by seniors on their safe use of a vehicle. Our findings suggest that literature lacks focus on the meaning and value that individuals assign to the occupation of driving, and the impact of technology use when actually driving. Thus, research is needed on the meaning of driving for seniors and on enabling participation in this meaningful occupation. Furthermore, understanding the meaning of driving for older adults may lend to understanding technology use.

Objectives for discussion:

  1. The discussion in this presentation will focus on ways an occupational perspective can be used to broaden occupation informed driving research for seniors.

References

Arksey, H., & O Malley, L. (2005). Scoping studies: towards a methodological framework. International Journal of Social Research Methodology, 8(1), 19-32.Cook, A.M. & Polgar, J.M. (2008). Cook & Hussey’s assistive technologies: Principles and Practice (3rd edition). St. Louis, MO: Mosby Elsevier.

Hocking, C. (1997). Person-object interaction model: Understanding the use of everyday objects. Journal of Occupational Science, 4(1), 27-35. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14427591.1997.9686418

Persson, D., Erlandsson, L.-K., Eklund, M., & Iwarsson, S. (2001): Value dimensions, meaning, and complexity in human occupation—a tentative structure for analysis. Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, 8: 7–18. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/110381201300078447

Rumrill, P. D., Fitzgerald, S. M., & Merchant, W. R. (2010). Using scoping literature reviews as a means of understanding and interpreting existing literature. Work: A Journal of Prevention, Assessment and Rehabilitation, 35(3), 399-404.

Comments

Research paper

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Oct 21st, 1:00 PM Oct 21st, 1:30 PM

Use of occupational science to advance the study of senior’s use of technology in safe driving

In today’s society, driving is often seen as a means toward an end rather than a meaningful occupation. The use of after-market technology by seniors is recommended to enhance safe use of the private vehicle. While there is great interest in the topic of seniors and driving there is limited research specific to senior’s use of after-market technology related to the continuous and safe use of a private vehicle. This knowledge is needed to assist the growing population of senior drivers and passengers to continuously enable participation in the occupation of driving, and to inform driver training programs for seniors.

Thus, as a starting point a scoping review was conducted (Arskey and O’Malley, 2005). Research papers published in English were selected according to relevancy rather than quality criteria. Official reports referred to in the papers were tracked back and included if relevant.

Literature mapping (e.g. year of publication, source and characteristic of text, disciplinary background of authors) and concept mapping was performed (Rumrill, Fitzgerald, & Merchant, 2010). Concepts were mapped using an occupational perspective informed by the work of the HAAT model (Cook and Polgar 2008), Person-Object Model (Hocking 1997), and the meaning (Persson et al., 2001) of driving. Literature mapping revealed that the knowledge is largely informed from three fields of studies: the disability literature on adaptive technologies; the aging literature on the functional losses and deficits of individuals; and the human factors and design literature. The conceptual mapping exercise informed by our occupational perspective helped to frame the numerous key concepts/attributes in the literature about technology use by seniors such as intuitiveness, redundancy of information and tolerance to error, adaptability, and flexibility, as well the models underscored the need for research that evaluates the usability and compatibility of technologies by seniors on their safe use of a vehicle. Our findings suggest that literature lacks focus on the meaning and value that individuals assign to the occupation of driving, and the impact of technology use when actually driving. Thus, research is needed on the meaning of driving for seniors and on enabling participation in this meaningful occupation. Furthermore, understanding the meaning of driving for older adults may lend to understanding technology use.

Objectives for discussion:

  1. The discussion in this presentation will focus on ways an occupational perspective can be used to broaden occupation informed driving research for seniors.