Title

Of human bondage - A neglected construct in occupational science: The relationship of pain to occupational deprivation

Start Time

21-10-2011 1:00 PM

End Time

21-10-2011 1:30 PM

Session Type

Event

Abstract

As a mid century novelist, Somerset Maughn delved into issues of human bondage resulting from the pain of psychosocial interactions. As occupational scientists, we have ignored the essential nature of pain and the human condition. We have neglected to include or even cursorily focus upon the human condition of pain and how pain limits, restricts, or changes time use patterns of participation in daily life with resulting occupational deprivation. Just as Maughn’s characters were bonded to the painful conditions that psychosocial issues created, humans are bonded to the restrictions that pain inflicts upon everyday life and the human condition. It is time to include consideration of pain as a dimension of engagement in occupation, or lack thereof, across the lifespan. In this paper, pain is postulated to be one of the primary drivers of occupational deprivation. This paper will focus upon four main areas: (a) Review of pertinent, though sparse, literature in occupational science and pain (Fisher, Emerson, Firpo, Ptak, Wonn and Bartolacci (2007), (b) summary insights from two autoenthographies of pain in daily life (Neveille-Jan, 2003) and the concomitant condition of increasing occupational deprivation, and (c) the evolving need to attend to pain and its effects upon occupation in daily life from theory and research perspectives, as recently brought to light by our international colleagues (Engel-Yeger and Dunn, 2011; Robinson, Kennedy, & Harsom, 2011) and (d) cross cultural considerations of pain related to daily activity, especially the occupation of sleep (Pilowsky, Drettenden and Townley, 1985).

Discussion Questions:

  1. How does the variable of pain and degree of pain fit into the theoretical foundations of occupational science, specifically, occupational deprivaiton?
  2. What existing literature supports the construct of pain as a variable affecting occupation?
  3. How are occupations affected by pain?

References

Engel-Yeger, B., Dunn, W. (2011). Relationship between pain catastrophizing level and sensory processing patterns in typical adults. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, Vol. 65, No. 1, e1-e10. http://dx.doi.org/10.5014/ajot.2011.09004

Fisher, G.S., Emerson, L., Firpo, C., Ptak, J., Wonn, J., and Bartolacci, G. (2007). Chronic pain and occupation: An exploration of the lived experience. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, May/June, Vol. 61, No. 3, 290-302.

Neville-Jan, A. (2003). Encounters in a world of pain: auto ethnography. American Journal of Occupational therapy, Vol. 57, No. 1, 88-98. http://dx.doi.org/10.5014/ajot.57.1.88

Pilowky, I, Crettenden, I., and Townley, M. (1985). Sleep disturbance in pain clinic patients. Pain, Vol 23, No. 1, 27-33. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0304-3959(85)90227-1

Robinson, K., Kennedy, N., and Harmon, d. (2011). The issue is…Is occupational therapy adequately meeting ht needs of people with chronic pain? American Journal of Occupational Therapy, Vol. 65, No. 1, 106-113. http://dx.doi.org/10.5014/ajot.2011.09160

Comments

Theoretical paper

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Oct 21st, 1:00 PM Oct 21st, 1:30 PM

Of human bondage - A neglected construct in occupational science: The relationship of pain to occupational deprivation

As a mid century novelist, Somerset Maughn delved into issues of human bondage resulting from the pain of psychosocial interactions. As occupational scientists, we have ignored the essential nature of pain and the human condition. We have neglected to include or even cursorily focus upon the human condition of pain and how pain limits, restricts, or changes time use patterns of participation in daily life with resulting occupational deprivation. Just as Maughn’s characters were bonded to the painful conditions that psychosocial issues created, humans are bonded to the restrictions that pain inflicts upon everyday life and the human condition. It is time to include consideration of pain as a dimension of engagement in occupation, or lack thereof, across the lifespan. In this paper, pain is postulated to be one of the primary drivers of occupational deprivation. This paper will focus upon four main areas: (a) Review of pertinent, though sparse, literature in occupational science and pain (Fisher, Emerson, Firpo, Ptak, Wonn and Bartolacci (2007), (b) summary insights from two autoenthographies of pain in daily life (Neveille-Jan, 2003) and the concomitant condition of increasing occupational deprivation, and (c) the evolving need to attend to pain and its effects upon occupation in daily life from theory and research perspectives, as recently brought to light by our international colleagues (Engel-Yeger and Dunn, 2011; Robinson, Kennedy, & Harsom, 2011) and (d) cross cultural considerations of pain related to daily activity, especially the occupation of sleep (Pilowsky, Drettenden and Townley, 1985).

Discussion Questions:

  1. How does the variable of pain and degree of pain fit into the theoretical foundations of occupational science, specifically, occupational deprivaiton?
  2. What existing literature supports the construct of pain as a variable affecting occupation?
  3. How are occupations affected by pain?