Title

Assessment of student learning in providing occupation-based programming for at-risk children in a day care setting

Start Time

20-10-2011 7:30 PM

End Time

20-10-2011 8:45 PM

Session Type

Event

Abstract

For occupational therapy educators and researchers, the understanding of the process involved in the enablement of occupation is still evolving (Trentham & Cockburn, 2005). This is particularly true in the study and understanding of childhood occupations and how they develop (Humphry, 2005). There has been a need identified in the field for an approach to knowledge and social change that acknowledges in its process and outcomes the “impact of inequity, the determinants of health, client-centered practice, and cultural diversity” (Trentham & Cockburn, 2005, p. 33). The purpose of this study is to examine and assess student learning outcomes of 9 students who participated in a Master’s Project to develop occupation based programming for at risk children in a community based day care setting. A partnership with Northside Child Development Center in North Minneapolis, MN, was developed and the setting was used as a place where OT students could facilitate improved occupational development and participation for a preschool group of at-risk children. Methods for student learning were developed based on tenets of participatory action research (PAR) in regards to examining existing social structures and occupational development of at-risk preschoolers ( Trentham & Cockburn, 2005). The students worked in collaboration with 5 preschool teachers to develop programming that would facilitate occupational development and participation of the preschool students in their day care setting. This study will examine student learning outcomes in regards to providing occupation based programming and increasing occupational participation for at risk preschoolers. Systematic review using qualitative methods will be used to analyze student journal and portfolio reflections and in the analysis of teacher feedback on student programs. This research contributes to the body of knowledge in the study of occupation as a means and an outcome, as well as explores how students learn occupation based practice.

Discussion Questions:

  1. What are the strengths and limitations of using participatory action research (PAR) to increase student learning of occupational participation for at-risk preschool children?
  2. How is PAR compatible or inconsistent with occupation based and client centered practice?
  3. What are the best methodologies to study occupation based practice student outcomes?
  4. What are the benefits to using qualitative methods?
  5. What would a mixed method design look like?

References

Cockburn, L., & Trentham, B. (2002). Participatory action research: Integrating community occupational therapy practice and research. The Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy, 69(1), pg 20-31.

Fazio, L. (2008). Developing occupation-centered programs for the community. New Jersey: Pearson.

Humphry, R. (2005). Model of processes transforming occupations: Exploring societal social influences. Journal of Occupational Science, 12(1), pg. 36-44. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14427591.2005.9686546

Pollard, N., Kronenberg, F., M., & Sakellariou, D. (2008). A political practice of occupational therapy. In Pollard, N., Kronenberg, F., M. & Sakellariou, D. (Eds.), A Political Practice of Occupational Therapy (pp.3-19). London: Elsevier.

Trentham, B., & Cockburn, L. (2005). Participatory action research: Creating new knowledge and opportunities for occupational engagement. In Kronenberg, F., Simo Algado, S., & Pollard, N (Eds.), Occupational Therapy Without Borders: Learning From the Spirit of Survivors (pp.440-453). London: Elsevier.

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Oct 20th, 7:30 PM Oct 20th, 8:45 PM

Assessment of student learning in providing occupation-based programming for at-risk children in a day care setting

For occupational therapy educators and researchers, the understanding of the process involved in the enablement of occupation is still evolving (Trentham & Cockburn, 2005). This is particularly true in the study and understanding of childhood occupations and how they develop (Humphry, 2005). There has been a need identified in the field for an approach to knowledge and social change that acknowledges in its process and outcomes the “impact of inequity, the determinants of health, client-centered practice, and cultural diversity” (Trentham & Cockburn, 2005, p. 33). The purpose of this study is to examine and assess student learning outcomes of 9 students who participated in a Master’s Project to develop occupation based programming for at risk children in a community based day care setting. A partnership with Northside Child Development Center in North Minneapolis, MN, was developed and the setting was used as a place where OT students could facilitate improved occupational development and participation for a preschool group of at-risk children. Methods for student learning were developed based on tenets of participatory action research (PAR) in regards to examining existing social structures and occupational development of at-risk preschoolers ( Trentham & Cockburn, 2005). The students worked in collaboration with 5 preschool teachers to develop programming that would facilitate occupational development and participation of the preschool students in their day care setting. This study will examine student learning outcomes in regards to providing occupation based programming and increasing occupational participation for at risk preschoolers. Systematic review using qualitative methods will be used to analyze student journal and portfolio reflections and in the analysis of teacher feedback on student programs. This research contributes to the body of knowledge in the study of occupation as a means and an outcome, as well as explores how students learn occupation based practice.

Discussion Questions:

  1. What are the strengths and limitations of using participatory action research (PAR) to increase student learning of occupational participation for at-risk preschool children?
  2. How is PAR compatible or inconsistent with occupation based and client centered practice?
  3. What are the best methodologies to study occupation based practice student outcomes?
  4. What are the benefits to using qualitative methods?
  5. What would a mixed method design look like?