Title

Time Use of People with Parkinson’s Disease

Start Time

22-10-2011 2:00 PM

End Time

22-10-2011 2:30 PM

Session Type

Event

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this research study was to investigate the time use patterns of persons with Parkinson’s disease and compare these to older adults in general and to other populations with disabling conditions. Because quality of life is an important outcome to this group, time use patterns were also compared with a quality of life measure.

Methods: A convenience sample of 49 persons was recruited from urban and rural areas of a rocky mountain state in the U.S. A 24-hour recall time use interview was used to gather data about each participant’s activities, setting, persons present, and physical and mental state (Liedberg, Hesselstrand, & Hendriksson, 2004). A quality of life measure, the Parkinson’s Disease Questionnaire- 39 (Jenkinson, Fitzpatrick, & Peto, 1998), was also administered. Activities were coded according categories from American Occupational Therapy Framework (2008): activities of daily living, instrumental activities of daily living, sleep/rest, work, leisure, and social participation. Descriptive statistics and inferential statistics were used (e.g., correlations) for data analysis.

Results: Differences in time use patterns of people with PD compared to the general population were in time spent alone, time spent engaging in instrumental activities of daily living (IADL), time spent engaging in leisure/social participation, and time spent with the television present. Differences and similarities in time use patterns for people with PD compared to other populations with disabilities in time spent engaging in employment, IADL, leisure/social participation, rest/sleep, and activities of daily living. Significant correlations were found between physical and mental states during an activity and the PDQ- 39, and being in the community and the PDQ-39.

Discussion: There is an imbalance in time use patterns of people with PD compared to the general population. Understanding this imbalance may promote the redirection of therapy to meet the occupational needs of this population. Understanding the physical and mental states of a person during activities has a strong correlation to the quality of life experienced by the individual.

Contribution to Occupational Science: Expanding the occupational science knowledge regarding time use patterns of different populations can help researchers understand the impact of occupation on health. Also, the study’s results can also shape future interventions offered in the profession of occupational therapy.

Questions for Discussion:

  1. How can occupations be designed or modified to promote a positive mental or physical state in persons with Parkinson’s disease?
  2. How can built and social environments be designed or modified to facilitate optimum social participation for this population?

References

American Occupational Therapy Association (2008). Occupational therapy practice framework: Domain and process (2nd ed). American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 62(6), 625–683. http://dx.doi.org/10.5014/ajot.62.6.625

Jenkinson, C., Fitzpatrick, R., & Peto, V. (1998). The Parkinson’s Disease Questionnaire: User Manual for the PDQ-39, PDQ-8 and the PDQ Summary Index. Oxford: University of Oxford Health Services Research Unit.

Liedberg, G. M., Hesselstrand, M. E., & Hendriksson, C. M. (2004). Time use and activity patterns in women with long-term pain. Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, 11, 26-35. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/11038120410019081

Comments

Research paper

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Oct 22nd, 2:00 PM Oct 22nd, 2:30 PM

Time Use of People with Parkinson’s Disease

Purpose: The purpose of this research study was to investigate the time use patterns of persons with Parkinson’s disease and compare these to older adults in general and to other populations with disabling conditions. Because quality of life is an important outcome to this group, time use patterns were also compared with a quality of life measure.

Methods: A convenience sample of 49 persons was recruited from urban and rural areas of a rocky mountain state in the U.S. A 24-hour recall time use interview was used to gather data about each participant’s activities, setting, persons present, and physical and mental state (Liedberg, Hesselstrand, & Hendriksson, 2004). A quality of life measure, the Parkinson’s Disease Questionnaire- 39 (Jenkinson, Fitzpatrick, & Peto, 1998), was also administered. Activities were coded according categories from American Occupational Therapy Framework (2008): activities of daily living, instrumental activities of daily living, sleep/rest, work, leisure, and social participation. Descriptive statistics and inferential statistics were used (e.g., correlations) for data analysis.

Results: Differences in time use patterns of people with PD compared to the general population were in time spent alone, time spent engaging in instrumental activities of daily living (IADL), time spent engaging in leisure/social participation, and time spent with the television present. Differences and similarities in time use patterns for people with PD compared to other populations with disabilities in time spent engaging in employment, IADL, leisure/social participation, rest/sleep, and activities of daily living. Significant correlations were found between physical and mental states during an activity and the PDQ- 39, and being in the community and the PDQ-39.

Discussion: There is an imbalance in time use patterns of people with PD compared to the general population. Understanding this imbalance may promote the redirection of therapy to meet the occupational needs of this population. Understanding the physical and mental states of a person during activities has a strong correlation to the quality of life experienced by the individual.

Contribution to Occupational Science: Expanding the occupational science knowledge regarding time use patterns of different populations can help researchers understand the impact of occupation on health. Also, the study’s results can also shape future interventions offered in the profession of occupational therapy.

Questions for Discussion:

  1. How can occupations be designed or modified to promote a positive mental or physical state in persons with Parkinson’s disease?
  2. How can built and social environments be designed or modified to facilitate optimum social participation for this population?