Title

Caregiver Accommodations to Occupations and Sensory Features: A Mixed Methods Analysis

Start Time

22-10-2011 3:10 PM

End Time

22-10-2011 3:40 PM

Session Type

Event

Abstract

Background: Children’s occupational engagement is impacted by sensory features, and caregivers implement accommodations to occupations based on their children’s impairments (Dickie et al., 2009). Sensory features are highly prevalent among children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and developmental disabilities (DD) and are characterized by hyporesponsiveness, hyperresponsiveness and seeking (Baranek et al., 2006). However, there is a dearth of mixed methods research on caregiver accommodations to occupations based on sensory features of children ASD and other DD.

Methods: This mixed methods study used the Sensory Experiences Questionnaire Version 2.1 (SEQ; Baranek et al., 2006), a caregiver report instrument that characterizes children’s responses to sensory experiences and describes caregivers accommodations. The sample consisted of caregivers of children with ASD (n=94) and DD (n=62) (mean age = 49.7 months, SD=18.9). A sequential mixed methods approach will be used to analyze data, incorporating qualitative findings to further explain quantitative results (Creswell, 2009). Quantitative data was analyzed using multiple linear regression to determine the extent to which sensory patterns contributed to accommodations. Qualitative data from the SEQ will be divided into sensory patterns, reviewed, and coded for types of caregiver accommodations specific to sensory patterns. The emergent categories for caregiver accommodations within each sensory pattern will be compared.

Results: The patterns of hyporesponsiveness and hyperresponsiveness significantly contributed to caregiver accommodations, adjusted R2=.39, F(2,140)=46.06, p

Conclusions: The findings suggest that caregivers of children with ASD and DD implement accommodations to occupations based on children’s patterns of response. The current findings suggest that parents may interpret children’s sensory seeking behaviors differently than hyporesponsiveness and hyperresponsiveness. Qualitative analysis will assist in understanding the occupation accommodations caregivers utilize and how they may or may not be dependent on a child’s sensory pattern. This study has important implications for the study of the transaction of child sensory features and caregiver accommodations to occupations among families of children with ASD and DD, and the benefit of implementing a sequential mixed method design to further contribute to an understanding of the complexity of childhood occupations.

Objectives for Discussion:

  1. To what extent do child sensory patterns (hyporesponsiveness, hyperresponsiveness, sensory seeking) predict caregiver accommodations?
  2. Discuss types of caregiver accommodations to occupations as related to specific sensory patterns.

References

Baranek, G.T, David, F.J., Poe, M.D., Stone, W.L & Watson, L.R. (2006). Sensory Experiences Questionnaire: discriminating sensory features in young children with autism, developmental delays, and typical development. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 47(6), 591-601. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-7610.2005.01546.x

Creswell, J.W. (2009). Research design: Qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods approaches. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

Dickie, V.A., Baranek, G.T., Schultz, B., Watson, L.R., & McComish, C.A. (2009). Parent reports of sensory experiences of preschool children with and without autism: A qualitative study. The American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 63, 172-181. http://dx.doi.org/10.5014/ajot.63.2.172

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Research paper

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Oct 22nd, 3:10 PM Oct 22nd, 3:40 PM

Caregiver Accommodations to Occupations and Sensory Features: A Mixed Methods Analysis

Background: Children’s occupational engagement is impacted by sensory features, and caregivers implement accommodations to occupations based on their children’s impairments (Dickie et al., 2009). Sensory features are highly prevalent among children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and developmental disabilities (DD) and are characterized by hyporesponsiveness, hyperresponsiveness and seeking (Baranek et al., 2006). However, there is a dearth of mixed methods research on caregiver accommodations to occupations based on sensory features of children ASD and other DD.

Methods: This mixed methods study used the Sensory Experiences Questionnaire Version 2.1 (SEQ; Baranek et al., 2006), a caregiver report instrument that characterizes children’s responses to sensory experiences and describes caregivers accommodations. The sample consisted of caregivers of children with ASD (n=94) and DD (n=62) (mean age = 49.7 months, SD=18.9). A sequential mixed methods approach will be used to analyze data, incorporating qualitative findings to further explain quantitative results (Creswell, 2009). Quantitative data was analyzed using multiple linear regression to determine the extent to which sensory patterns contributed to accommodations. Qualitative data from the SEQ will be divided into sensory patterns, reviewed, and coded for types of caregiver accommodations specific to sensory patterns. The emergent categories for caregiver accommodations within each sensory pattern will be compared.

Results: The patterns of hyporesponsiveness and hyperresponsiveness significantly contributed to caregiver accommodations, adjusted R2=.39, F(2,140)=46.06, p

Conclusions: The findings suggest that caregivers of children with ASD and DD implement accommodations to occupations based on children’s patterns of response. The current findings suggest that parents may interpret children’s sensory seeking behaviors differently than hyporesponsiveness and hyperresponsiveness. Qualitative analysis will assist in understanding the occupation accommodations caregivers utilize and how they may or may not be dependent on a child’s sensory pattern. This study has important implications for the study of the transaction of child sensory features and caregiver accommodations to occupations among families of children with ASD and DD, and the benefit of implementing a sequential mixed method design to further contribute to an understanding of the complexity of childhood occupations.

Objectives for Discussion:

  1. To what extent do child sensory patterns (hyporesponsiveness, hyperresponsiveness, sensory seeking) predict caregiver accommodations?
  2. Discuss types of caregiver accommodations to occupations as related to specific sensory patterns.