Title

Exploring the critical ‘I’ through the critical eye: Critical visual methods and methodologies in occupational science research

Start Time

20-10-2011 7:30 PM

End Time

20-10-2011 8:45 PM

Session Type

Event

Abstract

Visual research methods as well as distinctive visual methodologies are growing in popularity and recognition in health-related research. Visual data and analysis can provide new ways for participants to engage with their thoughts and feelings, explore tacit occupations and engagement, and express their views on complex issues that are often too intricate to be articulated through conversation. Visuals also provide the opportunity to use metaphor and representation to express oneself while not feeling overly exposed or vulnerable in their responses (Solomon, 20006). This can be particularly useful when exploring non-compliance with practitioner advice, best practice, and critique of the health system in which the participants navigate.

Using visuals in critical research can help participants to explore their surroundings from a different viewpoint as well as use powerful metaphor and representative expression to explore and critique the structures that affect their agency (de Lange, Mitchell & Stuart, 2007). Visuals created by researchers and participants also expand the dissemination of research findings, leading to different ways of involving community members, service providers, and policy makers in the findings and implications of the research (de Lange, Mitchell & Stuart, 2007). In exploring the structures that affect occupational engagement and the opportunity to participate in desired and meaningful occupations, visually based research can help to build upon the research by adding a new perspective on how participants experience occupations, occupational engagement, and occupational disruptions.

Objectives for discussion period:

  1. When visual methods would be appropriate, as well as when they would not
  2. When a visual methodology would be used as opposed to a visual method operating within another methodology
  3. Which populations would benefit from this research
  4. What this research offers in regards to community involvement and research dissemination on a community level
  5. The challenges of publishing visual research

References

de Lange, N., Mitchell, C., & Stuart, J. (Eds.) (2007). Putting People in the Picture: Visual Methodologies for Social Change. Rotterdam, The Netherlands: Sense Publishers.

Mitchell, C. (2008). Getting the picture and changing the picture: Visual methodologies and educational research in South Africa. South African Journal of Education, 28, 365-383.

Solomon, J. (2006). “Living with X” A Body Mapping Journey in the time of HIV and AIDS: Facilitator’s Guide. REPSSI, South Africa.

Wang, C. & Burris, M.A. (1994). Empowerment through photo novella: Portraits of participation. Health Education & Behaviour, 21, 171-186. http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/109019819402100204

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Oct 20th, 7:30 PM Oct 20th, 8:45 PM

Exploring the critical ‘I’ through the critical eye: Critical visual methods and methodologies in occupational science research

Visual research methods as well as distinctive visual methodologies are growing in popularity and recognition in health-related research. Visual data and analysis can provide new ways for participants to engage with their thoughts and feelings, explore tacit occupations and engagement, and express their views on complex issues that are often too intricate to be articulated through conversation. Visuals also provide the opportunity to use metaphor and representation to express oneself while not feeling overly exposed or vulnerable in their responses (Solomon, 20006). This can be particularly useful when exploring non-compliance with practitioner advice, best practice, and critique of the health system in which the participants navigate.

Using visuals in critical research can help participants to explore their surroundings from a different viewpoint as well as use powerful metaphor and representative expression to explore and critique the structures that affect their agency (de Lange, Mitchell & Stuart, 2007). Visuals created by researchers and participants also expand the dissemination of research findings, leading to different ways of involving community members, service providers, and policy makers in the findings and implications of the research (de Lange, Mitchell & Stuart, 2007). In exploring the structures that affect occupational engagement and the opportunity to participate in desired and meaningful occupations, visually based research can help to build upon the research by adding a new perspective on how participants experience occupations, occupational engagement, and occupational disruptions.

Objectives for discussion period:

  1. When visual methods would be appropriate, as well as when they would not
  2. When a visual methodology would be used as opposed to a visual method operating within another methodology
  3. Which populations would benefit from this research
  4. What this research offers in regards to community involvement and research dissemination on a community level
  5. The challenges of publishing visual research