Title

Contextual factors that impact occupational engagement in breastfeeding

Start Time

4-10-2012 8:00 PM

End Time

4-10-2012 9:30 PM

Session Type

Event

Abstract

Breastfeeding is a co-occupation that supports the life-course health of both infants and mothers, and occupational engagement in breastfeeding is often defined by exclusivity and duration. Public health, medicine, and advocacy groups recommend exclusive breastfeeding of infants to at least 6 months of age (AAP, 2005; USDHHS, 2011). Most women in the United States do not meet this recommendation, often due to barriers from contextual factors. Many of these factors supporting or hindering breastfeeding are identified, but their influence on breastfeeding duration and exclusive breastfeeding is less understood (Li et al., 2008). This study uses the life-course perspective of health to examine relationships among breastfeeding duration and exclusive breastfeeding and various contextual factors of maternal employment, child care setting, and maternal health status (USDHHS, 2010). Results may inform health policy decisions related to the broader occupation of mothering. Study data were obtained from the longitudinal Infant Feeding Practices Study II (IFPS II) conducted by the FDA and CDC from 2005-2007. IFPS II surveyed a national sample of more than 4,900 mothers prenatally and repeatedly until their children were 12 months old (Fein et al., 2008). Bivariate and multivariate methods were used to measure association between the dependent variables breastfeeding duration and exclusive breastfeeding with personal contextual factors and contextual factors of maternal employment and child care setting. Duration of breastfeeding varied within the sample based on employment, childcare, and depression risk. The interaction of contextual factors also influences occupational engagement in breastfeeding. Recognizing and understanding those contextual factors that may influence duration and exclusivity of breastfeeding can assist in developing informed policies and practices likely to achieve the full health benefit of breastfeeding for mothers, infants, and society.

Objectives:

  1. Describe the application of the life-course perspective of health to the co-occupation of breastfeeding
  2. Discuss the relationships between breastfeeding duration and contextual factors of employment, child care, and health status
  3. Identify those contextual factors of employment and child care that present barriers to occupational engagement in breastfeeding
  4. Develop policy that supports engagement in the co-occupation of breastfeeding

References

American Academy of Pediatrics, Section on Breastfeeding. (2005). Breastfeeding and the use of human milk. Pediatrics, 115,(2): 496-506. http://dx.doi.org/10.1542/peds.2004-2491

Fein, S., Grummer-Strawn, L., and Raju, T. (2008). Infant feeding and care practices in the United States: results from the Infant Feeding Practices Study II. Pediatrics, 122: S25-S27. http://dx.doi.org/10.1542/peds.2008-1315b

Li, R., Fein, S., Chen, J., and Grummer-Strawn, L. (2008). Why mothers stop breastfeeding: mothers’ self-reported reasons for stopping during the first year. Pediatrics, 122: S69-S76. http://dx.doi.org/10.1542/peds.2008-1315i

United States Department of Health and Human Services. (2011) The Surgeon General’s Call to Action to Support Breastfeeding. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Surgeon General.

United States Department of Health and Human Services. (2010). Rethinking MCH: The Life Course Model as an Organizing Framework. Concept Paper. Health Resources and Services Administration. Maternal Child Health Bureau.

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Oct 4th, 8:00 PM Oct 4th, 9:30 PM

Contextual factors that impact occupational engagement in breastfeeding

Breastfeeding is a co-occupation that supports the life-course health of both infants and mothers, and occupational engagement in breastfeeding is often defined by exclusivity and duration. Public health, medicine, and advocacy groups recommend exclusive breastfeeding of infants to at least 6 months of age (AAP, 2005; USDHHS, 2011). Most women in the United States do not meet this recommendation, often due to barriers from contextual factors. Many of these factors supporting or hindering breastfeeding are identified, but their influence on breastfeeding duration and exclusive breastfeeding is less understood (Li et al., 2008). This study uses the life-course perspective of health to examine relationships among breastfeeding duration and exclusive breastfeeding and various contextual factors of maternal employment, child care setting, and maternal health status (USDHHS, 2010). Results may inform health policy decisions related to the broader occupation of mothering. Study data were obtained from the longitudinal Infant Feeding Practices Study II (IFPS II) conducted by the FDA and CDC from 2005-2007. IFPS II surveyed a national sample of more than 4,900 mothers prenatally and repeatedly until their children were 12 months old (Fein et al., 2008). Bivariate and multivariate methods were used to measure association between the dependent variables breastfeeding duration and exclusive breastfeeding with personal contextual factors and contextual factors of maternal employment and child care setting. Duration of breastfeeding varied within the sample based on employment, childcare, and depression risk. The interaction of contextual factors also influences occupational engagement in breastfeeding. Recognizing and understanding those contextual factors that may influence duration and exclusivity of breastfeeding can assist in developing informed policies and practices likely to achieve the full health benefit of breastfeeding for mothers, infants, and society.

Objectives:

  1. Describe the application of the life-course perspective of health to the co-occupation of breastfeeding
  2. Discuss the relationships between breastfeeding duration and contextual factors of employment, child care, and health status
  3. Identify those contextual factors of employment and child care that present barriers to occupational engagement in breastfeeding
  4. Develop policy that supports engagement in the co-occupation of breastfeeding