Title

Situated nature of everyday occupation: Occupational place in retirement

Start Time

4-10-2012 8:00 PM

End Time

4-10-2012 9:30 PM

Session Type

Event

Abstract

The concept of retirement is problematic with three definitions: economic, psychological and sociological. Its beginning is often unclear, emerging between mature adulthood and old age. Research has suggested a wide variety of changes in everyday contexts: slower rhythm in life; transformation of daily occupations and routines. The personal meaning of occupations also transforms through retirement (Jonsson, 2000). Retirement is a transitional process rather than an event, leading to learning about freedom and new attitudes toward life (Hodkinson, 2008).

This is a sub-study, part of a larger in-process qualitative study of the experience of retirement of 12 retirees, collected from unstructured interviews and analyzed with a phenomenological approach. This research has documented the situated nature of everyday occupation in the process of retirement. The retirees experienced their occupational place shifting through the transitional process. Their main occupational place shifts from a work oriented one to a place focused on family occupations, hobby or leisure activities, and local community occupations. One occupational place withdraws to the background and another comes gradually to the foreground. This presentation uses one case as an example: a 66 year-old retired craftsman, Nail.

At 15 years-old, Nail started working at a car parts factory. His identity was established through workaholic participation in his job, as he was inspired to become a mature and skilled craftsman, trusted at work. He rarely spent time with his family, spending even his weekends with his coworkers. At the age of 60, he had mandatory retirement, but remained, working as an advisor of young workers. However, he worked less time and felt empty and less confident. He recognized that he was out of the center of the work circle, but not in the center of his home circle either. As “a new comer” to family participation, he started doing house chores, gained respect for his wife as an experienced homemaker, and enjoyed interactions with his grandchildren.

At 65, Nail left the factory and found part time work at a smaller factory. He spent more time with family occupations and came to participate in his local community, acting as a school traffic guard. He is looking forward to continue to develop his new occupational place as a mature home/community participant after life as a mature craftsman.

After viewing the poster, the participants will be able to discuss: occupational place, changing of occupation in the transition in old age & life transition in retirement process.

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Oct 4th, 8:00 PM Oct 4th, 9:30 PM

Situated nature of everyday occupation: Occupational place in retirement

The concept of retirement is problematic with three definitions: economic, psychological and sociological. Its beginning is often unclear, emerging between mature adulthood and old age. Research has suggested a wide variety of changes in everyday contexts: slower rhythm in life; transformation of daily occupations and routines. The personal meaning of occupations also transforms through retirement (Jonsson, 2000). Retirement is a transitional process rather than an event, leading to learning about freedom and new attitudes toward life (Hodkinson, 2008).

This is a sub-study, part of a larger in-process qualitative study of the experience of retirement of 12 retirees, collected from unstructured interviews and analyzed with a phenomenological approach. This research has documented the situated nature of everyday occupation in the process of retirement. The retirees experienced their occupational place shifting through the transitional process. Their main occupational place shifts from a work oriented one to a place focused on family occupations, hobby or leisure activities, and local community occupations. One occupational place withdraws to the background and another comes gradually to the foreground. This presentation uses one case as an example: a 66 year-old retired craftsman, Nail.

At 15 years-old, Nail started working at a car parts factory. His identity was established through workaholic participation in his job, as he was inspired to become a mature and skilled craftsman, trusted at work. He rarely spent time with his family, spending even his weekends with his coworkers. At the age of 60, he had mandatory retirement, but remained, working as an advisor of young workers. However, he worked less time and felt empty and less confident. He recognized that he was out of the center of the work circle, but not in the center of his home circle either. As “a new comer” to family participation, he started doing house chores, gained respect for his wife as an experienced homemaker, and enjoyed interactions with his grandchildren.

At 65, Nail left the factory and found part time work at a smaller factory. He spent more time with family occupations and came to participate in his local community, acting as a school traffic guard. He is looking forward to continue to develop his new occupational place as a mature home/community participant after life as a mature craftsman.

After viewing the poster, the participants will be able to discuss: occupational place, changing of occupation in the transition in old age & life transition in retirement process.