Title

Supports and barriers to occupation: A meta-summary of qualitative studies from the Journal of Occupational Science

Start Time

4-10-2012 8:00 PM

End Time

4-10-2012 9:30 PM

Session Type

Event

Abstract

Statement of Purpose: This study applied a theoretically guided coding scheme to summarize the interacting factors reported in the results of qualitative research studies to determine how subjective experiences of occupation and supports or barriers to occupational performance influence occupation.

Description of Methods: A total of 11 qualitative studies from the Journal of Occupational Science (JOS) were identified through a search of the keyword, “meaning” within JOS article titles (date range: 1997-2010). A four-category a-priori coding scheme guided the meta-summary consisting of 1) positive and 2) negative subjective experience related to occupation, as well as 3) supports and 4) barriers to optimal or continued occupational performance. Codes associated with subjective experience related to occupation arose from the understanding that subjective experience is essential to defining occupation [1] and these experiences could be considered as having either a positive or negative affective valence [2]. Codes related to the supports and barriers to occupational performance were created to reflect a causal or transactional influence of personal or environmental factors upon occupation [3-5]. A total of 3 researchers were grouped in pairs to review and apply the coding scheme to the articles. Statements of research findings within the Results section of each article were used as primary data for applying the coding scheme. Disagreement in coding was resolved through the consensus of the three researchers.

Report of Results: The a-priori coding scheme was an efficient and informative way to categorize the findings across studies. A total of 440 codes were applied; the most common individually applied codes were positive subjective experience associated with occupation (n = 72) and support to occupational performance (n = 67). The most commonly applied code combinations indicated positive subjective experiences supported occupational performance (n = 84) and negative subjective experiences hindered occupational performance (n = 24). Findings also indicated specific personal or environmental factors which both support and hinder occupational performance, and that positive and negative subjective experiences may occur simultaneously with respect to occupation. Finally, the articles were far more likely to report positive rather than negative experiences associated with occupation as well as supports rather than barriers to occupational performance.

Discussion Questions:

  1. What can be learned when a theoretically guided a-priori coding strategy is applied in a qualitative meta-summary study?
  2. Can a theoretically guided a-priori coding strategy serve as a useful way to categorize qualitative data?

References

Hasselkus, B.R., The meaning of everyday occupation. 2002, Thorofare, NJ: SLACK.

Jonsson, H., Occupational transitions: Work to retirement, in Introduction to occupation: The art and science of living, C.H. Christiansen and E.A. Townsend, Editors. 2010, Pearson: Upper Saddle River, NJ. p. 211-230.

Polkinghorne, D.E., Narrative knowing and the human sciences1988, Albany, NY: State University of New York Press.

Little, B.R., Personal projects and free traits: Personality and motivation reconsidered. Social and Personality Psychology Compass, 2008. 2/3: p. 1235-1254. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1751-9004.2008.00106.x

Dickie, V., M.P. Cutchin, and R. Humphry, Occupation as transactional experience: A critique of individualism in occupational science. Journal of Occupational Science, 2006. 13: p. 83-93. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14427591.2006.9686573

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Oct 4th, 8:00 PM Oct 4th, 9:30 PM

Supports and barriers to occupation: A meta-summary of qualitative studies from the Journal of Occupational Science

Statement of Purpose: This study applied a theoretically guided coding scheme to summarize the interacting factors reported in the results of qualitative research studies to determine how subjective experiences of occupation and supports or barriers to occupational performance influence occupation.

Description of Methods: A total of 11 qualitative studies from the Journal of Occupational Science (JOS) were identified through a search of the keyword, “meaning” within JOS article titles (date range: 1997-2010). A four-category a-priori coding scheme guided the meta-summary consisting of 1) positive and 2) negative subjective experience related to occupation, as well as 3) supports and 4) barriers to optimal or continued occupational performance. Codes associated with subjective experience related to occupation arose from the understanding that subjective experience is essential to defining occupation [1] and these experiences could be considered as having either a positive or negative affective valence [2]. Codes related to the supports and barriers to occupational performance were created to reflect a causal or transactional influence of personal or environmental factors upon occupation [3-5]. A total of 3 researchers were grouped in pairs to review and apply the coding scheme to the articles. Statements of research findings within the Results section of each article were used as primary data for applying the coding scheme. Disagreement in coding was resolved through the consensus of the three researchers.

Report of Results: The a-priori coding scheme was an efficient and informative way to categorize the findings across studies. A total of 440 codes were applied; the most common individually applied codes were positive subjective experience associated with occupation (n = 72) and support to occupational performance (n = 67). The most commonly applied code combinations indicated positive subjective experiences supported occupational performance (n = 84) and negative subjective experiences hindered occupational performance (n = 24). Findings also indicated specific personal or environmental factors which both support and hinder occupational performance, and that positive and negative subjective experiences may occur simultaneously with respect to occupation. Finally, the articles were far more likely to report positive rather than negative experiences associated with occupation as well as supports rather than barriers to occupational performance.

Discussion Questions:

  1. What can be learned when a theoretically guided a-priori coding strategy is applied in a qualitative meta-summary study?
  2. Can a theoretically guided a-priori coding strategy serve as a useful way to categorize qualitative data?