Title

Diabetic Self Care Routines: Photo-elicitation and Interview

Start Time

6-10-2012 2:35 PM

End Time

6-10-2012 3:05 PM

Session Type

Event

Abstract

The purpose of this qualitative study was to describe the daily care routines of persons managing diabetes. Managing diabetes on a daily basis is a complex occupational demand that requires sophisticated understandings of medical routines, the balancing of diet and exercise, and ongoing judgment of how engagement in different occupations will impact blood sugar levels. Balancing engagement in desired and necessary daily occupations against compliance with medical recommendations for effective management of blood sugar levels is primarily the responsibility of the person with diabetes. Specific self care activities involved in self-management of diabetes include, but are not limited to, counting carbohydrates at each meal, exercising regularly, eating a low fat and high fiber diet, taking daily medications or insulin, regularly checking blood glucose levels with a finger stick, and monitoring feet for sores or infections. Although many studies have examined the medical management of diabetes, little research has examined the experience of daily diabetic care from an occupational perspective. This research contributes to occupational science by describing the use of habits and routines in managing chronic conditions.

Preliminary data was collected by means of participant photography and interviews. Participants included 10 persons with either Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes. Analysis combined photo-elicitation with a grounded theory approach. Methods were modeled on a study of quality of life in African American survivors of breast cancer that combined photographic data collection with grounded theory. For this study, photos were taken by participants in response to a suggested focus for their content. Participants were instructed to photograph daily self-care related to diabetes management. Photograph could be representative. Interviews were elicited through discussion of the photos. Analysis was ongoing with comparison across all data as new data was collected. As is common practice in grounded theory analysis, a theoretical description was developed through the following steps: derivation of an initial coding scheme, open data coding, memo writing, developing a second coding scheme, coding for axial themes, and development of the description from further memos. Results suggest that understanding occupations as an individual’s unique experience of constructing personally-tailored daily routines to manage diabetes is critical to a full understanding of effective diabetes management. Current results and planned research will be discussed.

Author Objectives:

  1. Describe the activities and occupations of daily self-management of diabetics.
  2. Stimulate discussion of the effects of disruption and re-establishment of habits and routines.
  3. Identify future research needs.

References

Lopez, E., Eng, E., Randall-David, E., & Robinson, N. (2005). Quality-of-life concerns of African American breast cancer survivors within rural North Carolina: Blending techniques of photovoice and grounded theory. Qualitative Health Research, 15 (1), 99-115. http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1049732304270766

Meetoo, D. & Allen, G. (2010). Understanding diabetes mellitus and its management: an overview. Nurse Prescribing, 8 (7), 320-326.

Pierce, D. (2001). Untangling occupation and activity. American Journal of Occupational Therapy. 55 (2), 138-146. http://dx.doi.org/10.5014/ajot.55.2.138

Pyatak, E. (2011b). Participation in occupation and diabetes management in emerging adulthood. American Journal of Occupational Therapy. 65 (4), 462-469. http://dx.doi.org/10.5014/ajot.2011.001453

Whittemore, R. & Roy, S. C. (2002). Adapting to diabetes mellitus: A theory synthesis. Nursing Science Quarterly, 15 (4), 311-317.

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Oct 6th, 2:35 PM Oct 6th, 3:05 PM

Diabetic Self Care Routines: Photo-elicitation and Interview

The purpose of this qualitative study was to describe the daily care routines of persons managing diabetes. Managing diabetes on a daily basis is a complex occupational demand that requires sophisticated understandings of medical routines, the balancing of diet and exercise, and ongoing judgment of how engagement in different occupations will impact blood sugar levels. Balancing engagement in desired and necessary daily occupations against compliance with medical recommendations for effective management of blood sugar levels is primarily the responsibility of the person with diabetes. Specific self care activities involved in self-management of diabetes include, but are not limited to, counting carbohydrates at each meal, exercising regularly, eating a low fat and high fiber diet, taking daily medications or insulin, regularly checking blood glucose levels with a finger stick, and monitoring feet for sores or infections. Although many studies have examined the medical management of diabetes, little research has examined the experience of daily diabetic care from an occupational perspective. This research contributes to occupational science by describing the use of habits and routines in managing chronic conditions.

Preliminary data was collected by means of participant photography and interviews. Participants included 10 persons with either Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes. Analysis combined photo-elicitation with a grounded theory approach. Methods were modeled on a study of quality of life in African American survivors of breast cancer that combined photographic data collection with grounded theory. For this study, photos were taken by participants in response to a suggested focus for their content. Participants were instructed to photograph daily self-care related to diabetes management. Photograph could be representative. Interviews were elicited through discussion of the photos. Analysis was ongoing with comparison across all data as new data was collected. As is common practice in grounded theory analysis, a theoretical description was developed through the following steps: derivation of an initial coding scheme, open data coding, memo writing, developing a second coding scheme, coding for axial themes, and development of the description from further memos. Results suggest that understanding occupations as an individual’s unique experience of constructing personally-tailored daily routines to manage diabetes is critical to a full understanding of effective diabetes management. Current results and planned research will be discussed.

Author Objectives:

  1. Describe the activities and occupations of daily self-management of diabetics.
  2. Stimulate discussion of the effects of disruption and re-establishment of habits and routines.
  3. Identify future research needs.