Title

Family decision-making for placement of the television in the bedrooms of children

Start Time

6-10-2012 2:00 PM

End Time

6-10-2012 2:30 PM

Session Type

Event

Abstract

Purpose/hypothesis: The increasing prevalence in childhood obesity (Ogden, Carroll, Kit, & Flegal, 2012) has been accompanied by an increase in time spent watching television by children (Rideout, Foehr, & Roberts, 2010). Independent of total time spent watching television, the presence of a television in children’s bedrooms (BTV) has been associated with overweight status, and health behaviors including less frequent family meals, lower engagement in school, less adequate sleep patterns, and lower participation in extracurricular activities/community service (Sisson, Broyles, Brittain, & Short, 2011). We do not, however, yet understand the family decision making process supporting or preventing the placement of BTV of children. A qualitative research approach elicited rich, individual personal experiences of families from their own points of view about this decision making process. The purpose for this study was to develop a model for understanding the family decision making process for BTV that will contribute to the understanding of family routines and coordination of daily activities.

Methods: Families with at least one school-age child were recruited from after-school programs in the Oklahoma City, OK area (n=21). Surveys administered over the phone collected demographic data. Two trained interviewers used an open-ended interview guide to perform family interviews. Digital recordings and field notes captured direct quotations about individual family attitudes, beliefs, and practices related to BTV. Systematic constant comparative methods of grounded theory (Charmaz, 2006) identified patterns and themes across cases for development of a model of family decision making for BTV.

Results: Researchers developed a model grounded in salient quotes from participant families to reflect the family decision making process for BTV. Nine themes emerged from the data: “I didn’t even think about it,” “benefit to me,” “watch a lot more TV and get less sleep,” “bedroom door would probably be closed a lot,” “everyone knows it rots your brain,” and what the heck are they watching.”

Discussions/Conclusions: The model of the family decision making for placement of BTV of children provides a visual organization of the both passive and active decision making processes influencing placement of BTV of children. Healthcare professionals across disciplines can use this model to develop interventions aimed at preventing BTV, potentially decreasing time spent watching television and influencing the prevalence of obesity.

Question: Occupational impact of television viewing and screen time in young children and family life

References

Charmaz, K. (2006). Constructing Grounded Theory. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

Ogden, C. L., Carroll, M. D., Kit, B. K., & Flegal, K. M. (2012). Prevalence of Obesity and Trends in

Body Mass Index Among US Children and Adolescents, 1999-2010. JAMA: The Journal of the American Medical Association. http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jama.2012.40

Rideout, V.J., Foehr, U.G., & Roberts, D.F. (2010). Generation of M2 media in the lives of 8-18 year olds. Kaiser Family Foundation.

Sisson, S.B., Broyles, S.T., Brittain, D.R., & Short, K. (2011). Obesogenic behaviors in U.S. school children across geographic regions from 2003-2007. Open Journal of Preventive Medicine, 1(2), 25-33. http://dx.doi.org/10.4236/ojpm.2011.12005

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Research paper

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Oct 6th, 2:00 PM Oct 6th, 2:30 PM

Family decision-making for placement of the television in the bedrooms of children

Purpose/hypothesis: The increasing prevalence in childhood obesity (Ogden, Carroll, Kit, & Flegal, 2012) has been accompanied by an increase in time spent watching television by children (Rideout, Foehr, & Roberts, 2010). Independent of total time spent watching television, the presence of a television in children’s bedrooms (BTV) has been associated with overweight status, and health behaviors including less frequent family meals, lower engagement in school, less adequate sleep patterns, and lower participation in extracurricular activities/community service (Sisson, Broyles, Brittain, & Short, 2011). We do not, however, yet understand the family decision making process supporting or preventing the placement of BTV of children. A qualitative research approach elicited rich, individual personal experiences of families from their own points of view about this decision making process. The purpose for this study was to develop a model for understanding the family decision making process for BTV that will contribute to the understanding of family routines and coordination of daily activities.

Methods: Families with at least one school-age child were recruited from after-school programs in the Oklahoma City, OK area (n=21). Surveys administered over the phone collected demographic data. Two trained interviewers used an open-ended interview guide to perform family interviews. Digital recordings and field notes captured direct quotations about individual family attitudes, beliefs, and practices related to BTV. Systematic constant comparative methods of grounded theory (Charmaz, 2006) identified patterns and themes across cases for development of a model of family decision making for BTV.

Results: Researchers developed a model grounded in salient quotes from participant families to reflect the family decision making process for BTV. Nine themes emerged from the data: “I didn’t even think about it,” “benefit to me,” “watch a lot more TV and get less sleep,” “bedroom door would probably be closed a lot,” “everyone knows it rots your brain,” and what the heck are they watching.”

Discussions/Conclusions: The model of the family decision making for placement of BTV of children provides a visual organization of the both passive and active decision making processes influencing placement of BTV of children. Healthcare professionals across disciplines can use this model to develop interventions aimed at preventing BTV, potentially decreasing time spent watching television and influencing the prevalence of obesity.

Question: Occupational impact of television viewing and screen time in young children and family life