Title

Occupational Science in High Places: A Scoping Review of World Federation of Occupational Therapists Documents

Start Time

4-10-2012 8:00 PM

End Time

4-10-2012 9:30 PM

Session Type

Event

Abstract

It is of consequence to occupational science that the discipline influence positions, policies and practices in occupational therapy (Yerxa, 1993). Accordingly, occupational science, through journals and conferences, seeks application of occupational science to clinical, social, educational, and political practices. Where the fields intersect, miss or diverge could be assessed with respect to publications, education, research, service, as examples. Indeed some national and local occupational therapy associations identify occupation as the core of practice and acknowledge occupational science as the unique academic discipline underpinning practice.

It is also of consequence to the World Federation of Occupational Therapists (WFOT) to assert itself as a political organisation, as members of the profession either resist or go along with established systems, funding arrangements, and roles both within medical settings and in broader contexts. In these many contexts occupational science principles informing human rights and occupational justice are needed by practitioners, educators and researchers in occupational therapy. Occupational science, in informing practice based in occupation, can also be conceived as political. WFOT’s International Advisory Group on Occupational Science brings these agendas together, primarily through the WFOT position statement on Occupational Science, which has recently been revised. However, a systematized review of the extent to which WFOT and occupational science have come together has not taken place to our knowledge.

The authors will utilize a form of scoping methodology described by Arsky and O’Malley (2005) to answer the question: What is the extent, nature and location of “occupational science” in documents generated and approved by the Council of the World Federation of Occupational Therapists? This process will begin with identification and study of relevant WFOT documents, including materials such as educational standards, Articles of Association, and official statements relative to occupational science, followed by charting the data using a narrative review and a template for analysis of documents. The summarized findings will be presented in a poster using a time line to illustrate key developments in occupational science relative to the nature, extent and location of occupational science concepts in WFOT documents. The poster will explain the methods and intent of the study, and provide a brief analysis of the status of occupational science in WFOT documents. Recommendations for further study or action to approach gaps or incongruities will be identified.

Objectives:

  1. Identify the extent, nature and location of occupational science concepts in current WFOT documents.
  2. Describe the relationship of WFOT documents that include occupational science concepts to key events and publications in the evolution of occupational science.
  3. Posit areas of development for WFOT and other OT associations to adopt and benefit from occupational science and principles of occupational justice supported by the discipline.

References

Arksey, H. and O’Malley, L. (2005). Scoping studies: Towards a methodological framework. International Journal of Social Science Research Methodology, 8(1): 19-32. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/1364557032000119616

Yerxa, E. J. (1993). Occupational science: A new source of power for participants in occupational therapy. Journal of Occupational Science: Australia, 1(1), 3-9. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14427591.1993.9686373

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Oct 4th, 8:00 PM Oct 4th, 9:30 PM

Occupational Science in High Places: A Scoping Review of World Federation of Occupational Therapists Documents

It is of consequence to occupational science that the discipline influence positions, policies and practices in occupational therapy (Yerxa, 1993). Accordingly, occupational science, through journals and conferences, seeks application of occupational science to clinical, social, educational, and political practices. Where the fields intersect, miss or diverge could be assessed with respect to publications, education, research, service, as examples. Indeed some national and local occupational therapy associations identify occupation as the core of practice and acknowledge occupational science as the unique academic discipline underpinning practice.

It is also of consequence to the World Federation of Occupational Therapists (WFOT) to assert itself as a political organisation, as members of the profession either resist or go along with established systems, funding arrangements, and roles both within medical settings and in broader contexts. In these many contexts occupational science principles informing human rights and occupational justice are needed by practitioners, educators and researchers in occupational therapy. Occupational science, in informing practice based in occupation, can also be conceived as political. WFOT’s International Advisory Group on Occupational Science brings these agendas together, primarily through the WFOT position statement on Occupational Science, which has recently been revised. However, a systematized review of the extent to which WFOT and occupational science have come together has not taken place to our knowledge.

The authors will utilize a form of scoping methodology described by Arsky and O’Malley (2005) to answer the question: What is the extent, nature and location of “occupational science” in documents generated and approved by the Council of the World Federation of Occupational Therapists? This process will begin with identification and study of relevant WFOT documents, including materials such as educational standards, Articles of Association, and official statements relative to occupational science, followed by charting the data using a narrative review and a template for analysis of documents. The summarized findings will be presented in a poster using a time line to illustrate key developments in occupational science relative to the nature, extent and location of occupational science concepts in WFOT documents. The poster will explain the methods and intent of the study, and provide a brief analysis of the status of occupational science in WFOT documents. Recommendations for further study or action to approach gaps or incongruities will be identified.

Objectives:

  1. Identify the extent, nature and location of occupational science concepts in current WFOT documents.
  2. Describe the relationship of WFOT documents that include occupational science concepts to key events and publications in the evolution of occupational science.
  3. Posit areas of development for WFOT and other OT associations to adopt and benefit from occupational science and principles of occupational justice supported by the discipline.