Title

A Student Elective Course Exploring Occupational Justice through Use of Occupational Storytelling and Story Making

Start Time

4-10-2012 8:00 PM

End Time

4-10-2012 9:30 PM

Session Type

Event

Abstract

The population is growing older, people are living longer, and there is a strong need for occupational therapy students to understand and apply concepts of occupational justice in order to understand all people, whether in a nursing home or living at home, deserve the same opportunities and engagement in occupation to facilitate their well-being (Townsend & Wilcock, 2004). The purpose of this poster is to present an evidence-based occupational therapy (EBOT) project that was completed to answer the question: Will 2nd year MOT students who enroll in an “Occupation in Long-Term Care (LTC)” elective be able to apply concepts of occupational justice in the LTC environment through engaging residents in occupational storytelling and story making in order to facilitate resident self-advocacy for participation in a valued occupation? The course was a two hour, once a week course, spanning eight weeks, and was designed to allow students to alternate weekly between the classroom and the nursing home environment. Eight MOT students participated in the elective course. Classroom learning activities included; discussions, lectures, and self-directed learning activities. The classroom activities focused on learning the concepts of occupational justice and self-advocacy as outcomes of the occupational therapy process (AOTA, 2008) and understanding the use of occupational storytelling and story making (Clark, 1993). LTC facility activities included eight students working with seven residents to facilitate storytelling and then story making in order to assist the residents in developing plans for participation in valued occupations. The Model of Occupational Empowerment (Fisher and Hotchkiss, 2008) was taught to assist in guiding the students understanding of occupational deprivation in the LTC setting (Magasi & Hammel, 2009) and the need to assist residents in their abilities in self-advocacy for valued occupations. Outcome evaluation measurements used to indicate that the evidence-based question was answered included; use of a pre/post knowledge survey developed by the evidence-based practitioner to obtain quantitative data and reflective journaling by the students to obtain qualitative data. The results of qualitative data indicated four major student identified themes in understanding the concepts of occupational storytelling and story making and are presented in the poster. Positive trends in averages on the pre-post knowledge surveys indicated student learning of occupational justice concepts and are also presented in the poster.

Poster Objectives:

  1. Understand how an occupational therapy elective course can be developed to teach MOT students concepts of occupational justice in the long-term care environment (LTC)
  2. Examine student themes of learning occupational storytelling and story making when working with LTC residents in order to understand how to facilitate residents participation in meaningful occupations

References

AOTA (2008). Occupational therapy practice framework: Domain & process (2nd ed). The American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 62, 625-688. http://dx.doi.org/10.5014/ajot.62.6.625

Clark, F. (1993). Occupation embedded in a real life: Interweaving occupational science and occupational therapy 1993 Eleanor Clarke Slagle lecture. The American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 47, 1067-1078. http://dx.doi.org/10.5014/ajot.47.12.1067

Fisher, G. S. & Hotchkiss, A. (2008). A model of occupational empowerment for marginalized populations in community environment. Occupational Therapy in Health Care, 1, 55-71. http://dx.doi.org/10.1300/J003v22n01_05

Magasi, S. & Hammel, J. (2009). Women with disabilities’ experiences in long-term care: A case for social justice. The American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 63, 35-45. http://dx.doi.org/10.5014/ajot.63.1.35

Townsend, E. & Wilcock, A. A. (2004). Occupational justice and client-centered practice: A dialogue in progress. Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy, 71, 75-89.

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Oct 4th, 8:00 PM Oct 4th, 9:30 PM

A Student Elective Course Exploring Occupational Justice through Use of Occupational Storytelling and Story Making

The population is growing older, people are living longer, and there is a strong need for occupational therapy students to understand and apply concepts of occupational justice in order to understand all people, whether in a nursing home or living at home, deserve the same opportunities and engagement in occupation to facilitate their well-being (Townsend & Wilcock, 2004). The purpose of this poster is to present an evidence-based occupational therapy (EBOT) project that was completed to answer the question: Will 2nd year MOT students who enroll in an “Occupation in Long-Term Care (LTC)” elective be able to apply concepts of occupational justice in the LTC environment through engaging residents in occupational storytelling and story making in order to facilitate resident self-advocacy for participation in a valued occupation? The course was a two hour, once a week course, spanning eight weeks, and was designed to allow students to alternate weekly between the classroom and the nursing home environment. Eight MOT students participated in the elective course. Classroom learning activities included; discussions, lectures, and self-directed learning activities. The classroom activities focused on learning the concepts of occupational justice and self-advocacy as outcomes of the occupational therapy process (AOTA, 2008) and understanding the use of occupational storytelling and story making (Clark, 1993). LTC facility activities included eight students working with seven residents to facilitate storytelling and then story making in order to assist the residents in developing plans for participation in valued occupations. The Model of Occupational Empowerment (Fisher and Hotchkiss, 2008) was taught to assist in guiding the students understanding of occupational deprivation in the LTC setting (Magasi & Hammel, 2009) and the need to assist residents in their abilities in self-advocacy for valued occupations. Outcome evaluation measurements used to indicate that the evidence-based question was answered included; use of a pre/post knowledge survey developed by the evidence-based practitioner to obtain quantitative data and reflective journaling by the students to obtain qualitative data. The results of qualitative data indicated four major student identified themes in understanding the concepts of occupational storytelling and story making and are presented in the poster. Positive trends in averages on the pre-post knowledge surveys indicated student learning of occupational justice concepts and are also presented in the poster.

Poster Objectives:

  1. Understand how an occupational therapy elective course can be developed to teach MOT students concepts of occupational justice in the long-term care environment (LTC)
  2. Examine student themes of learning occupational storytelling and story making when working with LTC residents in order to understand how to facilitate residents participation in meaningful occupations