Title

Moral quests in everyday narratives of women living with chronic conditions

Start Time

6-10-2012 2:00 PM

End Time

6-10-2012 2:30 PM

Session Type

Event

Abstract

Is there a moral obligation to manage well and do ‘good’ when living with chronic conditions? If so, how do women living with chronic conditions relate to moral issues embedded in the communities in which they live their everyday life?

Morality, the difference between right and wrong, is linked to all aspects of health and social life, and embedded in society’s general view of the ‘good’. The ‘good’ denotes a culture’s present and on-going rules and beliefs regarding what it are considered good and right to do and be.

This ethnography based study explored how four women living with chronic conditions related to and communicated moral issues in their everyday activities. Narrative analyses were conducted and showed that the women linked everyday events and happenings to moral quests rather than to moral issues. The analyses are presented in the form of four stories, stories which are emplotted with the different moral quests, quests that are grounded in the women’s everyday doing. For example, one woman was concerned of if she was doing well enough and another woman was wondering about her society’s good.

The four stories that form our interpretation show how the women experienced and managed unpredictability and contradictions in their everyday life and activities, due to their conditions and society’s labelling traditions. The quests communicate the significance of their experiences as human beings participating in a society where they are considered to be different.

Discussion:

  1. Why is it important for Occupational Science research to study individuals as encompassed in their local culture?
  2. How can occupational science research highlight cultural and societal issues?

References

Mattingly, C. (1998b). In Search of the Good: Narrative Reasoning in Clinical Practice. Medical Anthropology, 12(3), 273-297. http://dx.doi.org/10.1525/maq.1998.12.3.273

Polkinghorne, D. (1995). Narrative configuration in qualitative analyses. Qualitative studies in education. 8(1), 5-23. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0951839950080103

Rosenfeld, D., & Faircloth, C. (2004). Embodied fluidity and the commitment to movement: Constructing the moral self through arthritis narratives. Symbolic interaction, 27(4), 507-529. http://dx.doi.org/10.1525/si.2004.27.4.507

Comments

Research paper

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Oct 6th, 2:00 PM Oct 6th, 2:30 PM

Moral quests in everyday narratives of women living with chronic conditions

Is there a moral obligation to manage well and do ‘good’ when living with chronic conditions? If so, how do women living with chronic conditions relate to moral issues embedded in the communities in which they live their everyday life?

Morality, the difference between right and wrong, is linked to all aspects of health and social life, and embedded in society’s general view of the ‘good’. The ‘good’ denotes a culture’s present and on-going rules and beliefs regarding what it are considered good and right to do and be.

This ethnography based study explored how four women living with chronic conditions related to and communicated moral issues in their everyday activities. Narrative analyses were conducted and showed that the women linked everyday events and happenings to moral quests rather than to moral issues. The analyses are presented in the form of four stories, stories which are emplotted with the different moral quests, quests that are grounded in the women’s everyday doing. For example, one woman was concerned of if she was doing well enough and another woman was wondering about her society’s good.

The four stories that form our interpretation show how the women experienced and managed unpredictability and contradictions in their everyday life and activities, due to their conditions and society’s labelling traditions. The quests communicate the significance of their experiences as human beings participating in a society where they are considered to be different.

Discussion:

  1. Why is it important for Occupational Science research to study individuals as encompassed in their local culture?
  2. How can occupational science research highlight cultural and societal issues?