Title

The First Ten Years: A Descriptive Analysis of Presentation Abstracts of the SSO:USA, 2002 to 2011

Start Time

4-10-2012 8:00 PM

End Time

4-10-2012 9:30 PM

Session Type

Event

Abstract

This mixed methods study of the first ten years of presentations of the Society for the Study of Occupation: USA (SSO: USA) yields important information about the development over time of occupational science as a disciplinary body of knowledge. A quantitative and qualitative descriptive analysis of the abstracts of peer-reviewed presentations at the first ten annual meetings of the SSO: USA was separately and then collaboratively completed by a group of four researchers. Carrying forward the methods used in the previously published examination of the first five years of research reported at the SSO:USA, this ten-year study used descriptive statistics to portray the methods being used in OS and the populations studied, as well as using thematic analysis via HyperRESEARCH coding to describe the degree to which occupations studied were individual alone, individual shared, shared group characteristics, and population level. This in-progress research will report emergent themes in the research interests of occupational scientist over the first ten years of the Society. Implications of the study for the future of occupational science will be discussed, including gaps in occupational science research, methodological trends and needs, and possible influences on researchers’ choices in regard to topics of future research.

Author Objectives:

  1. Highlight the role of a research society as an institutional structure that supports the development of a discipline.
  2. Identify research trends and needs in occupational science.
  3. Stimulate discussion of the future directions of occupational science.

References

Abbott, A. (2004, January). Becoming discipline: From occupational therapy to occupational science. Paper presented at the Occupational Science Symposium XVI: Creating an Aademic Discipline That Supports Practice, Los Angeles, CA.

Glover, J. (2009). The literature of occupational science: A systematic, quantitative examination of peer -reviewed publications from 1996 to 2006. Journal of Occupational Science, 16(2), 92-103. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14427591.2009.9686648

Molke, D. K., Laliberte Rudman, D., & Polatajko, H. J. (2004). The promise of occupational science: A developmental assessment of an emerging academic discipline. Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy, 71(5), 269-280.

Pierce, D. (2012, October, in press). Promise: The Tenth Annual Ruth Zemke Lecture in Occupational Science. Journal of Occupational Science.

Pierce, D., Atler, K., Baltisberger, J., Fehringer, E., Hunter, E., Malkawi, S., Parr, T. (2010). Occupational science: A data-based American perspective. Journal of Occupational Science, 17 (4), 204-215. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14427591.2010.9686697

Comments

Poster

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Oct 4th, 8:00 PM Oct 4th, 9:30 PM

The First Ten Years: A Descriptive Analysis of Presentation Abstracts of the SSO:USA, 2002 to 2011

This mixed methods study of the first ten years of presentations of the Society for the Study of Occupation: USA (SSO: USA) yields important information about the development over time of occupational science as a disciplinary body of knowledge. A quantitative and qualitative descriptive analysis of the abstracts of peer-reviewed presentations at the first ten annual meetings of the SSO: USA was separately and then collaboratively completed by a group of four researchers. Carrying forward the methods used in the previously published examination of the first five years of research reported at the SSO:USA, this ten-year study used descriptive statistics to portray the methods being used in OS and the populations studied, as well as using thematic analysis via HyperRESEARCH coding to describe the degree to which occupations studied were individual alone, individual shared, shared group characteristics, and population level. This in-progress research will report emergent themes in the research interests of occupational scientist over the first ten years of the Society. Implications of the study for the future of occupational science will be discussed, including gaps in occupational science research, methodological trends and needs, and possible influences on researchers’ choices in regard to topics of future research.

Author Objectives:

  1. Highlight the role of a research society as an institutional structure that supports the development of a discipline.
  2. Identify research trends and needs in occupational science.
  3. Stimulate discussion of the future directions of occupational science.