Title

Research Poster Session - Dance as a Creative Intervention for Individuals with Parkinson’s Disease

Location

Magnolia Room

Start Time

17-10-2013 6:30 PM

End Time

17-10-2013 8:30 PM

Abstract

Individuals diagnosed with PD experience balance and movement difficulties, as well as cognitive and emotional challenges during the disease course. Symptoms impact the ability to participate in desired daily activities and affect quality of life (Kaesler, Mellifont, Kelly, & Taaffe, 2007). Research has shown dance has numerous physical benefits and improves mood for individuals with PD (Hackney & Earhart, 2009, 2010; Heiberger et al., 2011). The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore: a) the experiences of individuals with PD taking part in a 12 week, community-based adapted tango class, b) the perceived impact of the class on quality of life and participation in daily activities.

This case study incorporated a convenience sample of community-dwelling older adults with PD who were participants in the adapted tango class. Data collection methods included focus groups, class observations, and demographic surveys. Data analysis was completed through open and axial coding methods (Berg, 2009). Participants reported physical and cognitive improvements during the class and at the six month follow up. Participants also identified the importance of the social aspects of the class along with increased self-confidence for movement in daily activities. Results indicate adapted tango is a creative intervention which promotes the wellbeing and quality of life for individuals with PD.

Results from this study look to contribute to the scholarly literature in occupational science by advancing our understanding of the impact of creative interventions for individuals with PD, and their roles as occupational beings living with a progressive and degenerative disorder. After attending this session, participants will be able to describe the experiences and benefits of an adapted tango class for adults with Parkinson’s Disease (PD).

Key Words: Parkinson’s disease, dance, creativity

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Oct 17th, 6:30 PM Oct 17th, 8:30 PM

Research Poster Session - Dance as a Creative Intervention for Individuals with Parkinson’s Disease

Magnolia Room

Individuals diagnosed with PD experience balance and movement difficulties, as well as cognitive and emotional challenges during the disease course. Symptoms impact the ability to participate in desired daily activities and affect quality of life (Kaesler, Mellifont, Kelly, & Taaffe, 2007). Research has shown dance has numerous physical benefits and improves mood for individuals with PD (Hackney & Earhart, 2009, 2010; Heiberger et al., 2011). The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore: a) the experiences of individuals with PD taking part in a 12 week, community-based adapted tango class, b) the perceived impact of the class on quality of life and participation in daily activities.

This case study incorporated a convenience sample of community-dwelling older adults with PD who were participants in the adapted tango class. Data collection methods included focus groups, class observations, and demographic surveys. Data analysis was completed through open and axial coding methods (Berg, 2009). Participants reported physical and cognitive improvements during the class and at the six month follow up. Participants also identified the importance of the social aspects of the class along with increased self-confidence for movement in daily activities. Results indicate adapted tango is a creative intervention which promotes the wellbeing and quality of life for individuals with PD.

Results from this study look to contribute to the scholarly literature in occupational science by advancing our understanding of the impact of creative interventions for individuals with PD, and their roles as occupational beings living with a progressive and degenerative disorder. After attending this session, participants will be able to describe the experiences and benefits of an adapted tango class for adults with Parkinson’s Disease (PD).

Key Words: Parkinson’s disease, dance, creativity