Title

Research Poster Session - Understanding and Analyzing Reading as an Occupation: Reading Participation and Patterns of Performance of Children with Reading Difficulties

Location

Magnolia Room

Start Time

17-10-2013 6:30 PM

End Time

17-10-2013 8:30 PM

Abstract

Reading is an important occupation that children and adolescents participate in to fulfill many life roles. There is no literature in the fields of occupational science and occupational therapy exploring and defining reading as an occupation. Instead, reading has been traditionally defined as the ability to decode printed visual symbols into a spoken sound which the symbols designate (Walcutt, 1967). Contemporary literature has defined reading as a process in which children learn to use cues in identifying words in text (Tunmer & Greaney, 2010). Reading has also been understood as a skill that children acquire to successfully participate in school-related tasks and other daily living skills. The current trend in the education and neuroscience dyslexia literature is in understanding how reading abilities can be improved in children with reading difficulties. Resources defining reading as a meaningful activity that children participate in have been scarce in the education field. The closest existing definition of reading as an occupation is termed functional reading in classical literature. Functional reading is the ability to read and understand materials which are directly related to everyday living, materials which one must read to function in our society (Kirsch & Guthrie, 1977-78). This qualitative study aims to (1) operationalize reading not only as a skill children need to develop but as an occupation that children perform and participate in to fulfill many life roles; (2) describe how children with reading difficulties actively engage, find meaning in, and gather a sense of self-efficacy and mastery (Schkade & Schultz, 1992) during engagement in reading activities; and (3) provide foundational information to develop assessment and intervention strategies to improve participation and performance of children struggling with reading. 20 children in kindergarten to third grade with reading difficulties from two private schools in St. Louis, MO will be the main participants of the study. The researchers will conduct interviews with the students and their parents, perform 1 hour classroom observations, and initiate a 7-day log of reading activities performed at home. Additionally, the researchers will administer two questionnaires: The Motivations for Reading Questionnaire (Wigfield, Guthrie & McGough, 1996) and the author-developed Inventory of Reading Occupations. Results of the study will contribute to the field of occupational science in understanding the impacts of engagement, meaning, and purpose of reading in participation, performance, and the fulfillment of life roles of struggling readers.

References

Kirsch, I. & Guthrie, J.T. (1977-78). The concept of reading and measurement of functional literacy. Reading Research Quarterly, 13(4), 485-507.

Schkade, J.K., & Schultz, S. (1992). Occupational adaptation: Toward a holistic approach for contemporary practice, part 1. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 46(9), 829-837.

Tunmer, W., & Greaney, K. (2010). Defining dyslexia. Journal of Learning Disabilities, 43(3), 229-243.

Walcutt, C. (1967). Reading - a professional definition. The Elementary School Journal, 67(7), 363-365

Wigfield, A., Guthrie, J. & McGough, K. (1996). A questionnaire measure of children’s motivations for reading. (Instructional Resource No. 22). Athens, GA: Mational Reading Research Center.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Oct 17th, 6:30 PM Oct 17th, 8:30 PM

Research Poster Session - Understanding and Analyzing Reading as an Occupation: Reading Participation and Patterns of Performance of Children with Reading Difficulties

Magnolia Room

Reading is an important occupation that children and adolescents participate in to fulfill many life roles. There is no literature in the fields of occupational science and occupational therapy exploring and defining reading as an occupation. Instead, reading has been traditionally defined as the ability to decode printed visual symbols into a spoken sound which the symbols designate (Walcutt, 1967). Contemporary literature has defined reading as a process in which children learn to use cues in identifying words in text (Tunmer & Greaney, 2010). Reading has also been understood as a skill that children acquire to successfully participate in school-related tasks and other daily living skills. The current trend in the education and neuroscience dyslexia literature is in understanding how reading abilities can be improved in children with reading difficulties. Resources defining reading as a meaningful activity that children participate in have been scarce in the education field. The closest existing definition of reading as an occupation is termed functional reading in classical literature. Functional reading is the ability to read and understand materials which are directly related to everyday living, materials which one must read to function in our society (Kirsch & Guthrie, 1977-78). This qualitative study aims to (1) operationalize reading not only as a skill children need to develop but as an occupation that children perform and participate in to fulfill many life roles; (2) describe how children with reading difficulties actively engage, find meaning in, and gather a sense of self-efficacy and mastery (Schkade & Schultz, 1992) during engagement in reading activities; and (3) provide foundational information to develop assessment and intervention strategies to improve participation and performance of children struggling with reading. 20 children in kindergarten to third grade with reading difficulties from two private schools in St. Louis, MO will be the main participants of the study. The researchers will conduct interviews with the students and their parents, perform 1 hour classroom observations, and initiate a 7-day log of reading activities performed at home. Additionally, the researchers will administer two questionnaires: The Motivations for Reading Questionnaire (Wigfield, Guthrie & McGough, 1996) and the author-developed Inventory of Reading Occupations. Results of the study will contribute to the field of occupational science in understanding the impacts of engagement, meaning, and purpose of reading in participation, performance, and the fulfillment of life roles of struggling readers.