Title

Student Poster Session - Occupation as Andragogy Infused into an On-campus Student-run Outpatient Clinic

Start Time

October 2013

End Time

October 2013

Abstract

This poster will offer a model for an on-campus student-run out-patient clinic that uses occupation as andragogy for the clinical training of students. This clinic was founded from the premise that clinicians will be more apt to participate in occupation-based practice if exposed to it as students. This poster will depict one educational program that implemented a theoretical shift in their educational curriculum promoting knowledge generation for the adult learner through exposure to the use of occupation-based interventions co-current with classroom instruction and before fieldwork experiences.

Within this design, students review charts to screen for a client’s occupational goals, design treatment sessions having an occupation-based focus, and finally implement interventions with “occupation” as the outcome. A sequential tiering process for interventions is used. The tiering is based off the American Occupational Therapy Association Practice Framework, (AOTA, 2008) types of occupational therapy interventions which this Clinic implements in a sequential progression from preparation to purposeful activity to occupation. The student experiences the use of occupation as a pragmatic method to achieve client-centered goals and demonstrates this in documentation.

Co-occupations exist with faculty, students, and clients each having a unique perception of the Clinic experience. Faculty use the context of the Clinic as a new method for instruction and assessment. Students integrate classroom instruction into the design of interventions gaining hands-on experiences for reflection of personal strengths and areas that need more practice. Students set personal goals based on the Clinic experience collaboratively with the faculty supervisor. Clients underserved who may experience occupational injustice by not having an opportunity for therapy being under-insured, not insured, or running out of insurance benefits are seen.

This pro-bono clinic has been in existence for four years. Students have contact with underserved community clientele of various ages, ethnicities, and diagnoses for both individual and group sessions. Students are under faculty supervision at all times and a student peer mentoring design for feedback and assessment is used. The student peer mentoring design was uniquely designed for use in the Clinic to provide balance in appraising student performance to include a peer review as well as feedback from the faculty supervisor.Student peer mentoring has been shown to decrease student anxiety (Sprengel & Job, 2004) and increase confidence (Joe, 1998) in the learning process. Student peer mentoring was implemented in hopes of establishing a positive clinical experience using occupation as the therapeutic outcome for intervention.

This poster is based from a project which is in partial fulfillment of the author’s capstone project for an occupational therapy post-professional doctorate degree through the University of Utah. The capstone project will include a qualitative research study with the class of 2013 program graduates as participants who will give their opinions about the effectiveness of the Clinic for learning and preparation for fieldwork experiences, as well as impressions of the student peer mentoring design. This research is in progress with interviewing to be completed by June 30, 2013. Data obtained will be added to the poster for the 2013 SSO-USA Conference.

References

American Occupational Therapy Association. (2008). Occupational therapy practice framework: Domain and process (2nd ed.). American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 62, 625-283.

Joe, B. (1998). Are two heads better than one? In Privott, C. (Ed.), The Fieldwork Anthology: A Classic Research and Practice Collection. (pp. 319-320) Bethesda, Maryland: American Occupational Therapy Association.

Sprengel, A. D., & Job, L. (2004). Reducing student anxiety by using clinical peer mentoring with beginning nursing students. Nurse Educator, 29(6), 246-250.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Oct 18th, 12:40 PM Oct 18th, 1:30 PM

Student Poster Session - Occupation as Andragogy Infused into an On-campus Student-run Outpatient Clinic

This poster will offer a model for an on-campus student-run out-patient clinic that uses occupation as andragogy for the clinical training of students. This clinic was founded from the premise that clinicians will be more apt to participate in occupation-based practice if exposed to it as students. This poster will depict one educational program that implemented a theoretical shift in their educational curriculum promoting knowledge generation for the adult learner through exposure to the use of occupation-based interventions co-current with classroom instruction and before fieldwork experiences.

Within this design, students review charts to screen for a client’s occupational goals, design treatment sessions having an occupation-based focus, and finally implement interventions with “occupation” as the outcome. A sequential tiering process for interventions is used. The tiering is based off the American Occupational Therapy Association Practice Framework, (AOTA, 2008) types of occupational therapy interventions which this Clinic implements in a sequential progression from preparation to purposeful activity to occupation. The student experiences the use of occupation as a pragmatic method to achieve client-centered goals and demonstrates this in documentation.

Co-occupations exist with faculty, students, and clients each having a unique perception of the Clinic experience. Faculty use the context of the Clinic as a new method for instruction and assessment. Students integrate classroom instruction into the design of interventions gaining hands-on experiences for reflection of personal strengths and areas that need more practice. Students set personal goals based on the Clinic experience collaboratively with the faculty supervisor. Clients underserved who may experience occupational injustice by not having an opportunity for therapy being under-insured, not insured, or running out of insurance benefits are seen.

This pro-bono clinic has been in existence for four years. Students have contact with underserved community clientele of various ages, ethnicities, and diagnoses for both individual and group sessions. Students are under faculty supervision at all times and a student peer mentoring design for feedback and assessment is used. The student peer mentoring design was uniquely designed for use in the Clinic to provide balance in appraising student performance to include a peer review as well as feedback from the faculty supervisor.Student peer mentoring has been shown to decrease student anxiety (Sprengel & Job, 2004) and increase confidence (Joe, 1998) in the learning process. Student peer mentoring was implemented in hopes of establishing a positive clinical experience using occupation as the therapeutic outcome for intervention.

This poster is based from a project which is in partial fulfillment of the author’s capstone project for an occupational therapy post-professional doctorate degree through the University of Utah. The capstone project will include a qualitative research study with the class of 2013 program graduates as participants who will give their opinions about the effectiveness of the Clinic for learning and preparation for fieldwork experiences, as well as impressions of the student peer mentoring design. This research is in progress with interviewing to be completed by June 30, 2013. Data obtained will be added to the poster for the 2013 SSO-USA Conference.