Title

Delivering on the Promise of Occupation-Based Undergraduate Education: Occupational Science, Interprofessional Education, Health and Wellness

Location

Room C

Start Time

18-10-2013 3:40 PM

End Time

18-10-2013 5:10 PM

Session Type

Forum

Abstract

Rationale. Zemke (2004) indicated that the temporal aspects of occupation include the tempo, synchronization, duration, and sequence of occupational tasks. So it was at our University’s College of Health Professions that the time came to build on a strong philosophical base in occupational science, synchronize with our interprofessional partners, and create the sequence of an undergraduate major in Health, Wellness, and Occupational Studies (HWOS). The purpose of this Forum is to share and create a critical discourse regarding the development, implementation, and study of an undergraduate major in HWOS. It is an emergent answer to the “Promise” recommendations outlined by Pierce (2012, p. 306) to create further degree options in occupational science.

Aim. The Health, Wellness, and Occupational Studies undergraduate program is a dynamic and complex curriculum developed in 2009 and implemented in 2011 as a broad exploratory major replacing the undergraduate occupational therapy program. The HWOS curriculum grew to become the second largest undergraduate major at this health science University during its second year of existence. Set forward with a pioneering spirit, the curriculum is showing significant promise in what it intends to deliver. Interprofessional and interdependent (World Health Organization, 2010) this program is steeped in complexity science as it moves “beyond the individual” and toward the population level of education (Fogelberg and Frauwirth, 2010, p. 131). This interactive forum presented by the creators, administrators, and teachers involved, is evidence of progress toward the promise of occupational science baccalaureate education put forward by Pierce (2012). Evocative questions will be posed regarding interprofessional education and shared occupational experiences; the connection of occupation to health and wellness; how the study of occupation may co-effect students and faculty in health science; and the power of occupational science in an undergraduate curriculum.

Outcomes for participants: The objective of this Forum is to showcase an innovative interprofessional core curriculum and undergraduate major in Health, Wellness, and Occupational Studies. Initial data in appreciative inquiry (Keefe & Pesut, 2004) and pilot research on the interprofessional core curriculum will be integrated into the presentation. Participants will learn, critically analyze, contribute, and actively engage in the temporal aspects (Zemke, 2004) and potential promise (Pierce, 2012) of this occupational science program.

References

Fogelberg, D. & Frauwith, S. (2010). A complexity science approach to occupation: Moving beyond the individual. Journal of Occupational Science, 17(3), 131-139.

Keefe, M., & Pesut, D. (2004). Appreciative inquiry and leadership transitions. Journal of Professional Nursing, 20(2), 103-109.

Pierce, D. (2012). Promise. Journal of Occupational Science, 19(4), 298-311.

World Health Organization. (2010). A framework for action on interprofessional education & collaborative practice. Geneva, Switzerland: Author.

Zemke, R. (2004). Time, space, and the kaleidoscopes of occupation. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 58, 608-620.

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Oct 18th, 3:40 PM Oct 18th, 5:10 PM

Delivering on the Promise of Occupation-Based Undergraduate Education: Occupational Science, Interprofessional Education, Health and Wellness

Room C

Rationale. Zemke (2004) indicated that the temporal aspects of occupation include the tempo, synchronization, duration, and sequence of occupational tasks. So it was at our University’s College of Health Professions that the time came to build on a strong philosophical base in occupational science, synchronize with our interprofessional partners, and create the sequence of an undergraduate major in Health, Wellness, and Occupational Studies (HWOS). The purpose of this Forum is to share and create a critical discourse regarding the development, implementation, and study of an undergraduate major in HWOS. It is an emergent answer to the “Promise” recommendations outlined by Pierce (2012, p. 306) to create further degree options in occupational science.

Aim. The Health, Wellness, and Occupational Studies undergraduate program is a dynamic and complex curriculum developed in 2009 and implemented in 2011 as a broad exploratory major replacing the undergraduate occupational therapy program. The HWOS curriculum grew to become the second largest undergraduate major at this health science University during its second year of existence. Set forward with a pioneering spirit, the curriculum is showing significant promise in what it intends to deliver. Interprofessional and interdependent (World Health Organization, 2010) this program is steeped in complexity science as it moves “beyond the individual” and toward the population level of education (Fogelberg and Frauwirth, 2010, p. 131). This interactive forum presented by the creators, administrators, and teachers involved, is evidence of progress toward the promise of occupational science baccalaureate education put forward by Pierce (2012). Evocative questions will be posed regarding interprofessional education and shared occupational experiences; the connection of occupation to health and wellness; how the study of occupation may co-effect students and faculty in health science; and the power of occupational science in an undergraduate curriculum.

Outcomes for participants: The objective of this Forum is to showcase an innovative interprofessional core curriculum and undergraduate major in Health, Wellness, and Occupational Studies. Initial data in appreciative inquiry (Keefe & Pesut, 2004) and pilot research on the interprofessional core curriculum will be integrated into the presentation. Participants will learn, critically analyze, contribute, and actively engage in the temporal aspects (Zemke, 2004) and potential promise (Pierce, 2012) of this occupational science program.