Title

Family Occupation and Health: Findings from a Photo Production and Photo Elicitation Study

Presenter Information

Beth DeGraceFollow

Location

Room C

Start Time

18-10-2013 11:00 AM

End Time

18-10-2013 11:30 AM

Session Type

Research Paper

Abstract

Background: The uncertainty surrounding diagnosis and intervention options together with the unrelenting and persistent behaviors often demonstrated by children with autism, pose significant threat to the occupations of the family system and therefore family health.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explicate the experiences of family occupation and health through photography.

Methods: Twelve families were interviewed about family health and then proceeded to take pictures for one month of instances, situations and events that best represented their family's health. Families were asked to prioritize 10 pictures that best represented family health, rate the pictures on a likert scale and the describe why this picture reflected family health. The research team first used photo production methods of analysis to examine the product of occupation portrayed Analyses of the interview and ratings of the photographs were completed using photo elicitation methodology (Radley, 2011).

Findings: Results from the study suggest that family health is closely linked with social participation, play and instrumental activities of daily living. Meaning of family occupation was minimal across families and the majority of the pictures were related to autism. However, the activity of picture taking appeared to be a therapeutic intervention as families spoke of stories where the deliberate and critical review of family health was a moment of change in the engagement of family occupation.

Implications for Occupational Science: The results of this study offer furthered insight into the relationship between family occupation and family health, a critical step into refining the construct of family occupation.

Relation of Occupation and Education: Much of the concern of occupational therapy education is the occupation of the individual. This paper contributes to the body of knowledge, that occupation of systems must be addressed in professional education.

References

Radley, A. (2011). image and imagination. In P. Reavey (Ed.), Visual Methods in Psychology: Using and Interpreting Images in Qualitative Research. (pp. 18-28). New York: Psychology Press.

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Oct 18th, 11:00 AM Oct 18th, 11:30 AM

Family Occupation and Health: Findings from a Photo Production and Photo Elicitation Study

Room C

Background: The uncertainty surrounding diagnosis and intervention options together with the unrelenting and persistent behaviors often demonstrated by children with autism, pose significant threat to the occupations of the family system and therefore family health.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explicate the experiences of family occupation and health through photography.

Methods: Twelve families were interviewed about family health and then proceeded to take pictures for one month of instances, situations and events that best represented their family's health. Families were asked to prioritize 10 pictures that best represented family health, rate the pictures on a likert scale and the describe why this picture reflected family health. The research team first used photo production methods of analysis to examine the product of occupation portrayed Analyses of the interview and ratings of the photographs were completed using photo elicitation methodology (Radley, 2011).

Findings: Results from the study suggest that family health is closely linked with social participation, play and instrumental activities of daily living. Meaning of family occupation was minimal across families and the majority of the pictures were related to autism. However, the activity of picture taking appeared to be a therapeutic intervention as families spoke of stories where the deliberate and critical review of family health was a moment of change in the engagement of family occupation.

Implications for Occupational Science: The results of this study offer furthered insight into the relationship between family occupation and family health, a critical step into refining the construct of family occupation.

Relation of Occupation and Education: Much of the concern of occupational therapy education is the occupation of the individual. This paper contributes to the body of knowledge, that occupation of systems must be addressed in professional education.