Title

Teaching and Learning Occupational Science through an International Immersion Experience: A Phenomenological Study

Start Time

18-10-2013 1:30 PM

End Time

18-10-2013 2:00 PM

Session Type

Research Paper

Abstract

This study will explore how and what students learn through an occupational science course with an immersion component. Very little to no research has been published on teaching and learning occupational science through international immersion experiences. This study will describe an occupational science course, entitled “Community and Justice” taught to US students involving learning on campus and in Quito, Ecuador. Prior to traveling to Quito, students use class time to engage with articles and concepts which provide them with an occupational science lens to learn and participate. The context of Quito is used to facilitate student understanding about the influence of culture, politics, and socio-economics on occupational participation and choice. This is explored on individual and communal levels. While in Quito, students are immersed in the Ecuadorian culture through interactions with local organizations, cultural brokers, Spanish classes, home stays, reflections, and field trips.

A phenomenological approach will be taken in this study to understand the student experience of learning about occupational science while immersed in different culture. Participants will include fifteen graduate students enrolled in the course, Community and Justice. The panel of researchers will include two student participants and the faculty member leading the course. The curriculum consists of on-campus preparation and an immersion experience in Quito. Students are required to reflect on their participation through guided journal questions. Upon completion, the researchers will review entries from the students' journals to identify emergent themes. Triangulation will be used among the researchers as a method of data analysis. The thematic examination and presentation of findings will be based on the inductive processes (formal analysis, coding, compare and contrast, and identification of general themes) described by Dillaway, Lysack, and Luborsky, (2006).

Results will be reported as themes to show how and what students learn about occupational science in an immersion experience. Consistent with the theme of the conference, this study will contribute to our understanding of teaching and learning of occupational science. In addition, because this is a study involving faculty and student collaboration, students will share the experience of being both participant and researcher. They will highlight their unique learning of occupational science from a researcher perspective. Finally, the process of transitioning a campus based course to another country will be shared.

Key words: Education, International, Phenomenology

References

Dillaway, H., Lysack, C., & Luborsky, M.R., (2006). Qualitative approaches to interpreting and reporting data. In G. Kielhofner (Ed.), Research in occupational therapy: Methods of inquiry for enhancing practice (pp. 372 - 388). Philadelphia, PA: F.A. Davis Company.

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Oct 18th, 1:30 PM Oct 18th, 2:00 PM

Teaching and Learning Occupational Science through an International Immersion Experience: A Phenomenological Study

This study will explore how and what students learn through an occupational science course with an immersion component. Very little to no research has been published on teaching and learning occupational science through international immersion experiences. This study will describe an occupational science course, entitled “Community and Justice” taught to US students involving learning on campus and in Quito, Ecuador. Prior to traveling to Quito, students use class time to engage with articles and concepts which provide them with an occupational science lens to learn and participate. The context of Quito is used to facilitate student understanding about the influence of culture, politics, and socio-economics on occupational participation and choice. This is explored on individual and communal levels. While in Quito, students are immersed in the Ecuadorian culture through interactions with local organizations, cultural brokers, Spanish classes, home stays, reflections, and field trips.

A phenomenological approach will be taken in this study to understand the student experience of learning about occupational science while immersed in different culture. Participants will include fifteen graduate students enrolled in the course, Community and Justice. The panel of researchers will include two student participants and the faculty member leading the course. The curriculum consists of on-campus preparation and an immersion experience in Quito. Students are required to reflect on their participation through guided journal questions. Upon completion, the researchers will review entries from the students' journals to identify emergent themes. Triangulation will be used among the researchers as a method of data analysis. The thematic examination and presentation of findings will be based on the inductive processes (formal analysis, coding, compare and contrast, and identification of general themes) described by Dillaway, Lysack, and Luborsky, (2006).

Results will be reported as themes to show how and what students learn about occupational science in an immersion experience. Consistent with the theme of the conference, this study will contribute to our understanding of teaching and learning of occupational science. In addition, because this is a study involving faculty and student collaboration, students will share the experience of being both participant and researcher. They will highlight their unique learning of occupational science from a researcher perspective. Finally, the process of transitioning a campus based course to another country will be shared.

Key words: Education, International, Phenomenology