Title

Case simulation as an innovative pedagogical approach in occupational science graduate education

Location

Room A

Start Time

18-10-2013 12:10 PM

End Time

18-10-2013 12:40 PM

Session Type

Theoretical Paper

Abstract

Bridging theory or research to practice is a common outcome expectation for knowledge use in health services and professions. For occupational scientists there is a growing focus on bridging theory and research to policy or implementing change in real life situations and contexts. This expectation for knowledge to be used as a foundation to stimulate change for the benefit of society on a more practical level presents a new challenge for occupational science graduate education from a number of perspectives. This presentation explores some of the issues in introducing the use of a case-based pedagogy (Kim et al, 2006) to advance graduate education in occupational science. First, we need to identify the theories or occupation based research that can inform change at the population, societal, practical or policy level. Second, we need to explore and identify from a pedagogical perspective what case methods are coherent with bridging theory to practical change. And third, we need to explore ways to combine the theory and case-based pedagogy to inform graduate education and curriculum development in Occupational Science.


Case-based approaches are commonly used in professional programs to support an integrated understanding about interventions; however in the discipline of Occupational Science case-based approaches have a different purpose and outcome. The purpose of using a case-based approach in occupational science graduate education is to use occupational concepts and evidence to guide the critical analysis of the problem or issue and then to generate ways to address solutions or opportunities for change using constructs of occupational justice, occupational possibilities and identity to name a few. Case simulation is one approach that can be used to promote the application of occupational constructs.

In this presentation delegates will be introduced to 1) case simulation as a method, including process and features, 2) Hocking’s (2011) occupational analysis that can be used in integrative case-based teaching to advance the transfer of learning for graduate students, and 3) an application of this approach to the issue of promoting change in community accessibility and mobility for seniors who can no longer drive, which was grounded in a capabilities approach (Sen, 1999, 2009). Learning objectives, outcomes and innovative features of the approach will be highlighted.

References

  1. Kim, S., Phillips, W.R., Pinsk, L. Brock, D. Phillips, K., Keary, J. (2006). A conceptual framework for developing teaching cases: A review and synthesis of the literature across disciplines. Medical Education, 40, 867-876.

  2. Hocking, C. (2011). Public health and public health promotion. In L. Mackenzie & G.O’Toole (Eds.), Occupation analysis in practice (pp. 246-263). Chichester, UK:Wiley-Blackwell Publishers. ISBN 978-1-4051-7738-2.

  3. Sen, A. (1999). Development as Freedom. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.

  4. Sen, A. (2009). The Idea of Justice. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

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Oct 18th, 12:10 PM Oct 18th, 12:40 PM

Case simulation as an innovative pedagogical approach in occupational science graduate education

Room A

Bridging theory or research to practice is a common outcome expectation for knowledge use in health services and professions. For occupational scientists there is a growing focus on bridging theory and research to policy or implementing change in real life situations and contexts. This expectation for knowledge to be used as a foundation to stimulate change for the benefit of society on a more practical level presents a new challenge for occupational science graduate education from a number of perspectives. This presentation explores some of the issues in introducing the use of a case-based pedagogy (Kim et al, 2006) to advance graduate education in occupational science. First, we need to identify the theories or occupation based research that can inform change at the population, societal, practical or policy level. Second, we need to explore and identify from a pedagogical perspective what case methods are coherent with bridging theory to practical change. And third, we need to explore ways to combine the theory and case-based pedagogy to inform graduate education and curriculum development in Occupational Science.


Case-based approaches are commonly used in professional programs to support an integrated understanding about interventions; however in the discipline of Occupational Science case-based approaches have a different purpose and outcome. The purpose of using a case-based approach in occupational science graduate education is to use occupational concepts and evidence to guide the critical analysis of the problem or issue and then to generate ways to address solutions or opportunities for change using constructs of occupational justice, occupational possibilities and identity to name a few. Case simulation is one approach that can be used to promote the application of occupational constructs.

In this presentation delegates will be introduced to 1) case simulation as a method, including process and features, 2) Hocking’s (2011) occupational analysis that can be used in integrative case-based teaching to advance the transfer of learning for graduate students, and 3) an application of this approach to the issue of promoting change in community accessibility and mobility for seniors who can no longer drive, which was grounded in a capabilities approach (Sen, 1999, 2009). Learning objectives, outcomes and innovative features of the approach will be highlighted.