Title

Student Poster Session - Making Art

Start Time

18-10-2013 12:40 PM

End Time

18-10-2013 1:30 PM

Abstract

The number of adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) age 60 years and older is projected to nearly double from 641,860 in 2000 to 1.2 million by 2030 (Miniño, et al., 2009). These adults are more likely to lead sedentary lifestyles than their typically developing peers and are often segregated from the mainstream of adult life. Often remaining in a relative “child” role, they do not build their own social supports or networks outside of their family of origin. Chronic disabling conditions such as these limits the persons occupational roles and everyday occupations and may leave the person vulnerable to depression, loss of identity, and dissatisfaction with life (Reynolds & Prior, 2003).

Hayslip, Panek and Patrick (2007) suggest that all adults seek a developmental niche. A developmental niche is an environment in which a person can function optimally. For a typically developing adult, a developmental niche might be an employment or leisure setting that offers interesting challenges and is consistent with the individual’s values and occupational goals. Traditional health-care-based rehabilitation focuses on the transition period from the hospital to the community and also on the restoration of specific functions. The health care approach to rehabilitation does not support the establishment of developmental niches for persons with chronic conditions.

A community-based art program can help people verbally and non-verbally explain their thoughts and emotions (Henare, Hocking & Smythe, 2003). Art making can increase satisfaction with daily life. Reynolds, Vivat & Prior, (2007) reported that participants were more satisfied with their daily lives through gaining purpose, being challenged, and experiencing achievement. The participants also discussed an enhancement in self-image and self-confidence, which was directly related to the visibility of the artwork and offered proof that they had learned new skills. Participants in this study also felt hope for the future, with a renewed interest in these projects, rather than feeling bound by the functional limitations of their health status. Finally, the participants in this study began to gain positive relationships and contact with a healthy outside world.

The occupational science constructs of doing and being are integral to participation in expressive artistic activities, because the participant conveys personal thoughts and feelings through selection of activities, materials and completion of projects (TeBeest, Kornstedt, Feldmann & Harmasch, 2002). Art has been used in OT to help the client in achieving: (1) “rehabilitation goals”; (2) “using time”; (3) “enjoyment”; (4) “regaining confidence”, and; (5) “engagement in future activities” (Symons, Clark, Williams, Hansen & Orpin, 2011). In this participant observation study (in progress) the value that participants place on art making as a personal occupation was explored. Although the many of the participants had severe cerebral palsy and communication limitations, this group also valued the challenge, positive relationships, and social recognition gained through their art making.

References

Henare, D., Hocking, C., & Smythe, L. (2003). Chronic pain: Gaining understanding through the use of art. British Journal of Occupational Therapy, 66(11), 511-518.

Reynolds, F. (2004). Textile art promoting well-being in long-term illness: Some general and specific influences. Journal of Occupational Science, 11(2), 58-67.

Reynolds F, Vivat B, Prior S. (2008). Women's experiences of increasing subjective well-being in CFS/ME through leisure-based arts and crafts activities: a qualitative study. Disability and Rehabilitation 30(17):1279-88.

TeBeest, R., Kornstedt, K., Feldmann, C. and Harmasch, L. (2002). The Use of Expressive Arts in various Occupational Therapy Settings. UW-La Crosse Journal of Undergraduate Research, 5, 493-500.

Symons, J., Clark, H., Williams, K., Hansen, E., & Orpin, P. (2011). Visual art in physical rehabilitation: experiences of people with neurological conditions. British Journal of Occupational Therapy, 74(1), 44-52.

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Oct 18th, 12:40 PM Oct 18th, 1:30 PM

Student Poster Session - Making Art

The number of adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) age 60 years and older is projected to nearly double from 641,860 in 2000 to 1.2 million by 2030 (Miniño, et al., 2009). These adults are more likely to lead sedentary lifestyles than their typically developing peers and are often segregated from the mainstream of adult life. Often remaining in a relative “child” role, they do not build their own social supports or networks outside of their family of origin. Chronic disabling conditions such as these limits the persons occupational roles and everyday occupations and may leave the person vulnerable to depression, loss of identity, and dissatisfaction with life (Reynolds & Prior, 2003).

Hayslip, Panek and Patrick (2007) suggest that all adults seek a developmental niche. A developmental niche is an environment in which a person can function optimally. For a typically developing adult, a developmental niche might be an employment or leisure setting that offers interesting challenges and is consistent with the individual’s values and occupational goals. Traditional health-care-based rehabilitation focuses on the transition period from the hospital to the community and also on the restoration of specific functions. The health care approach to rehabilitation does not support the establishment of developmental niches for persons with chronic conditions.

A community-based art program can help people verbally and non-verbally explain their thoughts and emotions (Henare, Hocking & Smythe, 2003). Art making can increase satisfaction with daily life. Reynolds, Vivat & Prior, (2007) reported that participants were more satisfied with their daily lives through gaining purpose, being challenged, and experiencing achievement. The participants also discussed an enhancement in self-image and self-confidence, which was directly related to the visibility of the artwork and offered proof that they had learned new skills. Participants in this study also felt hope for the future, with a renewed interest in these projects, rather than feeling bound by the functional limitations of their health status. Finally, the participants in this study began to gain positive relationships and contact with a healthy outside world.

The occupational science constructs of doing and being are integral to participation in expressive artistic activities, because the participant conveys personal thoughts and feelings through selection of activities, materials and completion of projects (TeBeest, Kornstedt, Feldmann & Harmasch, 2002). Art has been used in OT to help the client in achieving: (1) “rehabilitation goals”; (2) “using time”; (3) “enjoyment”; (4) “regaining confidence”, and; (5) “engagement in future activities” (Symons, Clark, Williams, Hansen & Orpin, 2011). In this participant observation study (in progress) the value that participants place on art making as a personal occupation was explored. Although the many of the participants had severe cerebral palsy and communication limitations, this group also valued the challenge, positive relationships, and social recognition gained through their art making.