Title

Doctoral Programs in Occupational Science: Diversity and Potential

Location

Room A

Start Time

19-10-2013 11:10 AM

End Time

19-10-2013 12:40 PM

Session Type

Panel

Abstract

The intent of occupational science was to produce knowledge of occupation to support occupational therapy and to produce disciplinary academics (Clark, 2006; Clark et al, 1991; Yerxa, 1991, 1993, 1998). This panel includes overviews of five occupational science doctoral programs. Discussion will address how disciplinary doctoral education contributes to the science, as well as the successes, challenges, and pedagogy inherent in doing so.

Colorado State University

The interdisciplinary Ph.D. in Occupation and Rehabilitation Science at Colorado State University seeks to advance research, education and practice pertaining to this core subject: human performance and participation in everyday occupations and contexts. The first class began in fall 2013. The program requires students to support their dissertation work with scholarship of relevance to the core subject from the disciplines of occupational science and rehabilitation science. Individualized programs of study include in-depth immersion in mentored research experiences, and an accelerated MS. to Ph.D. option exists for entry-level occupational therapy students.

Towson University

The mission of the Department at Towson University is to promote education, research, and services that address occupational engagement and justice in support of the health and well-being of persons, organizations, and populations. Initiated in 2000, the doctoral program prepares graduates to expand knowledge of factors influencing the participation of people in their daily life activities or test theories of occupation. Core courses include the origin and evolution of occupational science and quality of life of individuals, communities, and populations.

University of North Carolina: Chapel Hill

The mission of UNC: Chapel Hill is to produce outstanding occupational scientists who develop, expand, and disseminate knowledge about occupation and translate that knowledge to various therapeutic arenas. The first doctoral cohort was admitted in 2005 and 13 students are currently enrolled. The curriculum follows a traditional Ph.D. course of study and offers seminars in five domains: core foundations in occupational science, topics of interest in occupational science, cognates on occupational and human activity, research design and methodology, and grant writing. Graduates are trained to excel in both teaching and research.

University of Southern California

Creating the first Ph.D. in occupational science in 1989, the USC Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy envisioned a cutting-edge discipline devoted to generating new and useful knowledge. Through a rigorous curriculum, the Division produces career scientists capable of securing competitive funding and positions at research intensive universities. Nearly 25 years later, 60 scholars have graduated from USC into academic positions worldwide while research within the Division informs both practice and theory.

University of Western Ontario

The occupational science field at the University of Western Ontario investigates a range of concepts in connection to occupation. An interdisciplinary program prepares graduates for academic, research, and policy-related careers. One of ten fields within a Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Graduate Program, first admissions occurred in 2006. Seven doctoral and five masters students have completed: six doctoral and six masters students are enrolled. Requirements include an occupational science theoretical foundations seminar, a comprehensive examination and dissertation, a methodology course and an elective.

References

Clark, F. (2006). One person’s thoughts on the future of occupational science. Journal of Occupational Science, 13(3), 167-179. doi:10.1080/14427591.2006.9726513

Clark, F., Parham, D., Carlson, M. E., Frank, G., Jackson, J., Pierce, D., . . . Zemke, R. (1991). Occupational science: Academic innovation in the service of occupational therapy's future. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 45, 300-310. doi:10.5014/ajot.45.4.300

Yerxa, E. (1991b). Occupational therapy: An endangered species or an academic discipline in the 21st century? American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 45, 680-685. doi:10.5014/ajot.45.8.680

Yerxa, E. (1993). Occupational science: A new source of power for participants in occupational therapy. Journal of Occupational Science, 1, 3-10. doi: 10.1080/14427591.1993.9686373

Yerxa, E. (1998b). Occupation: The keystone of a curriculum for a self-defined profession. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 52, 365-372. doi:10.5014/ajot.52.5.365

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Oct 19th, 11:10 AM Oct 19th, 12:40 PM

Doctoral Programs in Occupational Science: Diversity and Potential

Room A

The intent of occupational science was to produce knowledge of occupation to support occupational therapy and to produce disciplinary academics (Clark, 2006; Clark et al, 1991; Yerxa, 1991, 1993, 1998). This panel includes overviews of five occupational science doctoral programs. Discussion will address how disciplinary doctoral education contributes to the science, as well as the successes, challenges, and pedagogy inherent in doing so.

Colorado State University

The interdisciplinary Ph.D. in Occupation and Rehabilitation Science at Colorado State University seeks to advance research, education and practice pertaining to this core subject: human performance and participation in everyday occupations and contexts. The first class began in fall 2013. The program requires students to support their dissertation work with scholarship of relevance to the core subject from the disciplines of occupational science and rehabilitation science. Individualized programs of study include in-depth immersion in mentored research experiences, and an accelerated MS. to Ph.D. option exists for entry-level occupational therapy students.

Towson University

The mission of the Department at Towson University is to promote education, research, and services that address occupational engagement and justice in support of the health and well-being of persons, organizations, and populations. Initiated in 2000, the doctoral program prepares graduates to expand knowledge of factors influencing the participation of people in their daily life activities or test theories of occupation. Core courses include the origin and evolution of occupational science and quality of life of individuals, communities, and populations.

University of North Carolina: Chapel Hill

The mission of UNC: Chapel Hill is to produce outstanding occupational scientists who develop, expand, and disseminate knowledge about occupation and translate that knowledge to various therapeutic arenas. The first doctoral cohort was admitted in 2005 and 13 students are currently enrolled. The curriculum follows a traditional Ph.D. course of study and offers seminars in five domains: core foundations in occupational science, topics of interest in occupational science, cognates on occupational and human activity, research design and methodology, and grant writing. Graduates are trained to excel in both teaching and research.

University of Southern California

Creating the first Ph.D. in occupational science in 1989, the USC Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy envisioned a cutting-edge discipline devoted to generating new and useful knowledge. Through a rigorous curriculum, the Division produces career scientists capable of securing competitive funding and positions at research intensive universities. Nearly 25 years later, 60 scholars have graduated from USC into academic positions worldwide while research within the Division informs both practice and theory.

University of Western Ontario

The occupational science field at the University of Western Ontario investigates a range of concepts in connection to occupation. An interdisciplinary program prepares graduates for academic, research, and policy-related careers. One of ten fields within a Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Graduate Program, first admissions occurred in 2006. Seven doctoral and five masters students have completed: six doctoral and six masters students are enrolled. Requirements include an occupational science theoretical foundations seminar, a comprehensive examination and dissertation, a methodology course and an elective.