Title

International Development of Occupational Science: A Japanese Point of View.

Location

Room B

Start Time

19-10-2013 11:10 AM

End Time

19-10-2013 12:40 PM

Session Type

Forum

Abstract

Rationale: Over the past 25 years, occupational science concepts, methods and research have been introduced around the globe. The issue of cultural differences has been raised and Western scientists, in particular, have found complexities in dealing with Eastern philosophical and therapeutic traditions. This panel will discuss the history of occupational science related to that of occupational therapy in Japan, to outline some of these issues for discussion of the future direction of occupational science development.

Since 1995, sixteen Japanese Occupational Science Seminars (JOSS), annual academic meetings of occupational scientists, have been held. During the first decade, around 20-30 people (teachers of occupational therapy and scholars of occupational science), participated in the conferences. Since then, however, attendance has rapidly increased to more than 200 people. Meanwhile, the Japanese Society for the Study of Occupation (JSSO) was founded in 2006 and its membership is over 200. JSSO members are mainly relatively young occupational therapists without advanced academic background, interested in learning about occupational science, which unlike the West, is included in few of their bachelor’s degree entry-level occupational therapy education programs.

In the background is the history of Japanese occupational therapy, started in 1960s, importing American occupational therapist’s used of a medical model. Japanese occupational therapists valued a natural (physical) science perspective of patients while using traditional craft activities in their clinical practice. The occupation focused perspective transmitted from OT’s founders through Reilly and Yerxa in the 70’s and 80’s was not known among Japanese occupational therapists. In the 1990s Tsuyoshi Sato, one of the pioneers of Japanese Occupational Therapy, realized the contemporary identity crisis of Japanese occupational therapists and, having followed recent developments in the US and internationally, introduced occupational science as the core of occupational therapy. However, still today, many Japanese occupational therapists do not have this background, are not yet confident of themselves as health professionals and are searching for knowledge, such as that of occupational science, which can help them.

In multiple areas of Japan, these young JSSO members, described above, regularly gather in small groups to study occupational science and improve their clinical practice using occupational science knowledge. Such a situation, embedding occupational science deep within self-study for occupational therapy, seems unique with Japan. Analysis of and discussion in the forum will focus on the use of this form of education as a major future direction of occupational science development locally and globally.

Aims: In this forum, four presenters discuss the process of occupational science development in Japan, examples of occupational science education there, and issues for its future development. The purpose of the forum is, through this unique Japanese example, to discuss with SSO: USA participants how occupational science development might occur in different countries, locales, and cultures.

Potential Outcome: Using critical reflexivity regarding the development of occupational science in their own local cultures, attendees/participants of the forum will discuss their future developmental directions in occupational science. Participants will also share goals and methods for occupational science as an academic discipline from an international perspective.

Learning objectives: Participants will be able to think their future development directions in occupational science.  Participants will also share goals and methods for occupational science as an academic discipline from an international perspective.

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Oct 19th, 11:10 AM Oct 19th, 12:40 PM

International Development of Occupational Science: A Japanese Point of View.

Room B

Rationale: Over the past 25 years, occupational science concepts, methods and research have been introduced around the globe. The issue of cultural differences has been raised and Western scientists, in particular, have found complexities in dealing with Eastern philosophical and therapeutic traditions. This panel will discuss the history of occupational science related to that of occupational therapy in Japan, to outline some of these issues for discussion of the future direction of occupational science development.

Since 1995, sixteen Japanese Occupational Science Seminars (JOSS), annual academic meetings of occupational scientists, have been held. During the first decade, around 20-30 people (teachers of occupational therapy and scholars of occupational science), participated in the conferences. Since then, however, attendance has rapidly increased to more than 200 people. Meanwhile, the Japanese Society for the Study of Occupation (JSSO) was founded in 2006 and its membership is over 200. JSSO members are mainly relatively young occupational therapists without advanced academic background, interested in learning about occupational science, which unlike the West, is included in few of their bachelor’s degree entry-level occupational therapy education programs.

In the background is the history of Japanese occupational therapy, started in 1960s, importing American occupational therapist’s used of a medical model. Japanese occupational therapists valued a natural (physical) science perspective of patients while using traditional craft activities in their clinical practice. The occupation focused perspective transmitted from OT’s founders through Reilly and Yerxa in the 70’s and 80’s was not known among Japanese occupational therapists. In the 1990s Tsuyoshi Sato, one of the pioneers of Japanese Occupational Therapy, realized the contemporary identity crisis of Japanese occupational therapists and, having followed recent developments in the US and internationally, introduced occupational science as the core of occupational therapy. However, still today, many Japanese occupational therapists do not have this background, are not yet confident of themselves as health professionals and are searching for knowledge, such as that of occupational science, which can help them.

In multiple areas of Japan, these young JSSO members, described above, regularly gather in small groups to study occupational science and improve their clinical practice using occupational science knowledge. Such a situation, embedding occupational science deep within self-study for occupational therapy, seems unique with Japan. Analysis of and discussion in the forum will focus on the use of this form of education as a major future direction of occupational science development locally and globally.

Aims: In this forum, four presenters discuss the process of occupational science development in Japan, examples of occupational science education there, and issues for its future development. The purpose of the forum is, through this unique Japanese example, to discuss with SSO: USA participants how occupational science development might occur in different countries, locales, and cultures.

Potential Outcome: Using critical reflexivity regarding the development of occupational science in their own local cultures, attendees/participants of the forum will discuss their future developmental directions in occupational science. Participants will also share goals and methods for occupational science as an academic discipline from an international perspective.

Learning objectives: Participants will be able to think their future development directions in occupational science.  Participants will also share goals and methods for occupational science as an academic discipline from an international perspective.