Title

Inquiry and Practice in Occupation: The Means to Better Engagement

Location

Room D

Start Time

19-10-2013 9:00 AM

End Time

19-10-2013 9:30 AM

Session Type

Research Paper

Abstract

Scholars in occupational science and occupational therapy have demonstrated a growing interest in the effects of diabetes and facilitating individuals’ abilities to participate in diabetes self-management (DSM) (Pyatak, 2011; AOTA, 2011; Haltiwanger, 2012). Moreover, recent scholarship suggests that DSM can be characterized as a form of occupational engagement (Fritz, 2013), especially as it is named in the lexicon of culture, requires specific capacities, holds personal and social meanings, and is compared to normative standards (Hocking, 2009; Yerxa et al., 1990). Despite the growing awareness of diabetes and the difficulties people have engaging in DSM, researchers have yet to explore DSM as an occupation. We need to more fully understand how people engage in DSM and how contexts influence this process. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the role of occupation in the integration process. A qualitative study was conducted to explore the process by which individuals integrate DSM into daily life, the conditions influencing integration, and the role of habit and occupation in the process. The transactional perspective guided the study design (Cutchin & Dickie, 2013). A multi-methods approach, including semi-structured interviews, photography, time geographic diaries, and a standardized assessment was used to collect data on ten low income women, ages 40-64, with type II diabetes. A Grounded Theory approach to data analysis facilitated the development of the Transactional Model of Diabetes Self-Management Integration. The model depicts the theorized process of DSM integration and consists of the following phases: Potential Uptake, Inquiry Loop, Practice, Contingent Integration, and Reconfiguration. I present key findings and argue that the sub processes of Inquiry and Practice serve as the means by which individuals modify their habits, change their situations, and develop multiple strategies to facilitate DSM integration. Inquiry and practice are situated within occupational engagement, thereby drawing attention to the essential role of occupational engagement in becoming a more adept self-manager. The paper contributes to our understanding of the power of occupational engagement for personal growth and skill development while suggesting that the link between occupation and health may be due to the role of occupation in larger, more complex, life processes. The implications of this work for both occupational science and occupational therapy are discussed.

Objectives:

  • To raise awareness of the continued need for an occupational perspective in chronic illness self-management research
  • To demonstrate the central role of occupation in becoming more adept at health management
  • To present future areas of study, relevant to occupational scientists, that will be necessary to more fully understand and maximize the use of occupation in self-management interventions.

Keywords: Occupation, Inquiry, Practice

References

Cutchin, M. P., & Dickie, V. A. (2013). Transactional perspectives on occupation. New York: Springer.

Hocking, C. (2009). The challenge of occupation: Describing the things people do. Journal of Occupational Science, 16 (3), 140-150.

Pyatak, E. A. (2011). Participation in occupational and diabetes self-management in emerging adulthood. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 65, 462-469.

Sokol-McKay, D. (2011). Occupational therapy’s role in diabetes self-management (Fact Sheet). Retrieved from American Occupational Therapy Association website: http://www.aota.org/Consumers/Professionals/WhatIsOT/HW/Facts/Diabetes.aspx?FT=.pdf

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Oct 19th, 9:00 AM Oct 19th, 9:30 AM

Inquiry and Practice in Occupation: The Means to Better Engagement

Room D

Scholars in occupational science and occupational therapy have demonstrated a growing interest in the effects of diabetes and facilitating individuals’ abilities to participate in diabetes self-management (DSM) (Pyatak, 2011; AOTA, 2011; Haltiwanger, 2012). Moreover, recent scholarship suggests that DSM can be characterized as a form of occupational engagement (Fritz, 2013), especially as it is named in the lexicon of culture, requires specific capacities, holds personal and social meanings, and is compared to normative standards (Hocking, 2009; Yerxa et al., 1990). Despite the growing awareness of diabetes and the difficulties people have engaging in DSM, researchers have yet to explore DSM as an occupation. We need to more fully understand how people engage in DSM and how contexts influence this process. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the role of occupation in the integration process. A qualitative study was conducted to explore the process by which individuals integrate DSM into daily life, the conditions influencing integration, and the role of habit and occupation in the process. The transactional perspective guided the study design (Cutchin & Dickie, 2013). A multi-methods approach, including semi-structured interviews, photography, time geographic diaries, and a standardized assessment was used to collect data on ten low income women, ages 40-64, with type II diabetes. A Grounded Theory approach to data analysis facilitated the development of the Transactional Model of Diabetes Self-Management Integration. The model depicts the theorized process of DSM integration and consists of the following phases: Potential Uptake, Inquiry Loop, Practice, Contingent Integration, and Reconfiguration. I present key findings and argue that the sub processes of Inquiry and Practice serve as the means by which individuals modify their habits, change their situations, and develop multiple strategies to facilitate DSM integration. Inquiry and practice are situated within occupational engagement, thereby drawing attention to the essential role of occupational engagement in becoming a more adept self-manager. The paper contributes to our understanding of the power of occupational engagement for personal growth and skill development while suggesting that the link between occupation and health may be due to the role of occupation in larger, more complex, life processes. The implications of this work for both occupational science and occupational therapy are discussed.

Objectives:

  • To raise awareness of the continued need for an occupational perspective in chronic illness self-management research
  • To demonstrate the central role of occupation in becoming more adept at health management
  • To present future areas of study, relevant to occupational scientists, that will be necessary to more fully understand and maximize the use of occupation in self-management interventions.

Keywords: Occupation, Inquiry, Practice