Title

Occupation and archetype: Occupation as the agent of transformation and healing in myth and story

Location

Room B

Start Time

19-10-2013 9:00 AM

End Time

19-10-2013 9:30 AM

Session Type

Research Paper

Abstract

The journey toward health and well being, for individuals, populations and systems, is considered transformational by many disciplines. Occupation is an essential and powerful agent in this transformative experience. Occupational scientists have begun to look deeper into the historical and prehistorical meanings of occupation. Evidence for the ancient views of occupation and health often comes in the form of stories and myths of transformation, from oral tradition.

The objective of this paper is for listeners to appreciate the transformative role of occupation as told in myth and stories through time and cultures.

Scholars of myth and history consider the myths of a culture as ways that the culture is preserved and handed down through generations. These myths contain what we might today call explanatory models, giving meaning to who we are and what we do. Myths and the figures that populate them are archetypal, that is, they are the original patterns on which other similar persons, objects or concepts are modeled, what archetypal psychologists consider the deepest patterns of psychic functioning, the roots of the soul governing ourselves and the world. Occupation is archetypal as well, patterns and metaphors abound, as is richly illustrated in story over centuries and cultures. Myths are told through actions and occupations. Some are more obviously occupation driven, such as the labors of Hercules in the Greek myths and the many stories of weavers and weaving, by humans, spiders, and other beings, that occur in many cultures. Some of the occupational content may be subtler, such as the Greek Psyche's journey away from, and then back to, true union. Occupation is central to all of these stories. This paper suggests that as occupational scientists we can benefit from a longer, deeper view into the historical and prehistorical understanding of human occupation that will enable us to bring wisdom and creativity to our transformative interactions with clients, populations and systems.

This paper will be illustrated with a story.

Keywords: occupation, archetype, story

References

Campbell, J. (1990) Transformation of myth through time. San Francisco: Harper Perennial.

Hillman, J. (1991). A blue fire. New York: harper Perennial.

Jung, C. G. (1968). Man and his symbols, New York: Random House.

Taylor, E. W., & Cranton, P. (2012). The handbook of transformative learning: Theory, research and practice San Francisco : Jossey Bass.

Wilcock, A. A., (2002). Occupation for Health: Volume 2: A Journey from Prescription to Self Health. London: British Association and College of Occupational Therapists.

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Oct 19th, 9:00 AM Oct 19th, 9:30 AM

Occupation and archetype: Occupation as the agent of transformation and healing in myth and story

Room B

The journey toward health and well being, for individuals, populations and systems, is considered transformational by many disciplines. Occupation is an essential and powerful agent in this transformative experience. Occupational scientists have begun to look deeper into the historical and prehistorical meanings of occupation. Evidence for the ancient views of occupation and health often comes in the form of stories and myths of transformation, from oral tradition.

The objective of this paper is for listeners to appreciate the transformative role of occupation as told in myth and stories through time and cultures.

Scholars of myth and history consider the myths of a culture as ways that the culture is preserved and handed down through generations. These myths contain what we might today call explanatory models, giving meaning to who we are and what we do. Myths and the figures that populate them are archetypal, that is, they are the original patterns on which other similar persons, objects or concepts are modeled, what archetypal psychologists consider the deepest patterns of psychic functioning, the roots of the soul governing ourselves and the world. Occupation is archetypal as well, patterns and metaphors abound, as is richly illustrated in story over centuries and cultures. Myths are told through actions and occupations. Some are more obviously occupation driven, such as the labors of Hercules in the Greek myths and the many stories of weavers and weaving, by humans, spiders, and other beings, that occur in many cultures. Some of the occupational content may be subtler, such as the Greek Psyche's journey away from, and then back to, true union. Occupation is central to all of these stories. This paper suggests that as occupational scientists we can benefit from a longer, deeper view into the historical and prehistorical understanding of human occupation that will enable us to bring wisdom and creativity to our transformative interactions with clients, populations and systems.

This paper will be illustrated with a story.

Keywords: occupation, archetype, story