Title

The way we look: exploring visual methodologies in occupational science

Location

Hiawatha 3

Start Time

16-10-2014 1:30 PM

End Time

16-10-2014 4:30 PM

Abstract

Visual methodologies and methods encompass the use of various types of visual materials in systematic ways to understand, explain, and/or express a phenomenon. Visual methods can add to the study of occupation in numerous ways; for example, to access tacit and taken-for-granted aspects of occupation and to enhance awareness of cultural elements of occupation. In particular, visual methodologies and methods provide a key means to enact occupational science in critically informed ways, as they can be employed to work with collectives experiencing occupational marginalization to raise awareness of injustices and engage in praxis (Asaba et al., in press; Gastaldo, Carrasco & Magalhaes 2012; Hartman et al., 2011; Park, 2012).

The key objectives of this institute include: a) engage in a collective dialogue to identify epistemological, ethical, and practical considerations for research that employs visual methodologies and methods; b) provoke reflexivity regarding how the ‘visual’ is understood, constructed and interpreted; c) provide hands-on experience engaging with visual materials, and working through connecting a research purpose with visual methodologies and methods; d) collectively identify future possibilities for the use of visual methodologies and methods and e) provide opportunities to network amongst scholars with interests in visual methodologies and methods.

Part 1 of the institute will focus on epistemological, practical and ethical considerations. In order to facilitate critical reflection regarding how the ‘visual’ is understood and its potential to add to the study of occupation, 3, fifteen minute presentations will be used to illustrate epistemological, practical and ethical considerations in designing, carrying out, interpreting and disseminating such research. More specifically, examples will draw upon studies that have used body mapping to explore the impact of undocumentedness among migrant workers residing in the Great Toronto Area; Photovoice to identify and explore what supports and hinders aging processes among elder migrants in Sweden and Japan; and video and photography in ethnography for microanalysis of transformative processes that emerge in the interactions between persons and symbolic representation of embodied experiences. Following the presentations, participants will be divided into 3 small facilitated groups, with each group focused on one type of consideration (i.e., epistemological, practical, ethical). These small groups will share their lists of key considerations, and lists will be circulated to all participants who provide email contact information.

The second part will provide opportunities for hands-on engagement, in 1 of 3 groups. In one group, working with participants’ research ideas, facilitators will guide participants through the process of developing a rationale for using visual methods, reflecting on their epistemological perspective, and attempting to fit their research purpose and epistemological position with a methodology. In the second group, facilitators will expose participants to various ways photos can be drawn upon in research, and explore possibilities for analyses and interpretation of photographs. In the third group, participants will be lead through an approach to analysis of video and photographic material from narrative-phenomenological perspectives. The workshop will end with a discussion focused on identifying future possibilities for the use of visual methodologies and methods in occupational science.

Key words: epistemology, ethics, reflexivity

References

Asaba, E., Laliberte Rudman, D., Mondaca, M. & Park, M. (in press). Visual methods: Photovoice in focus. In S. Nayar and M. Stanley (Eds.), Research methodologies for occupational therapy and occupational science. Routledge.

Gastaldo, D.; Carrasco, C. & Magalhaes, L. (2012). Entangled in a web of exploitation and solidarity: Latin American undocumented workers in the Greater Toronto Area. Toronto, 200 pp. ISBN: 978-0-9810599-2-1 Available at www.migrationhealth.com

Hartman, L. R., Mandich, A., Magalhaes, L., & Orchard, T. (2011). How do we 'see' occupations? An examination of visual research methodologies in the study of human occupation. Journal of Occupational Science, 18(4), 292-305.

Park, M. (2012). Pleasure, throwing breaches, and embodied metaphors: tracing transformations-in-participation for a child with autism to a sensory integration-based therapy session. OTJR: Occupation, Participation and Health, 32(1 Suppl.), S34-S47.

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Oct 16th, 1:30 PM Oct 16th, 4:30 PM

The way we look: exploring visual methodologies in occupational science

Hiawatha 3

Visual methodologies and methods encompass the use of various types of visual materials in systematic ways to understand, explain, and/or express a phenomenon. Visual methods can add to the study of occupation in numerous ways; for example, to access tacit and taken-for-granted aspects of occupation and to enhance awareness of cultural elements of occupation. In particular, visual methodologies and methods provide a key means to enact occupational science in critically informed ways, as they can be employed to work with collectives experiencing occupational marginalization to raise awareness of injustices and engage in praxis (Asaba et al., in press; Gastaldo, Carrasco & Magalhaes 2012; Hartman et al., 2011; Park, 2012).

The key objectives of this institute include: a) engage in a collective dialogue to identify epistemological, ethical, and practical considerations for research that employs visual methodologies and methods; b) provoke reflexivity regarding how the ‘visual’ is understood, constructed and interpreted; c) provide hands-on experience engaging with visual materials, and working through connecting a research purpose with visual methodologies and methods; d) collectively identify future possibilities for the use of visual methodologies and methods and e) provide opportunities to network amongst scholars with interests in visual methodologies and methods.

Part 1 of the institute will focus on epistemological, practical and ethical considerations. In order to facilitate critical reflection regarding how the ‘visual’ is understood and its potential to add to the study of occupation, 3, fifteen minute presentations will be used to illustrate epistemological, practical and ethical considerations in designing, carrying out, interpreting and disseminating such research. More specifically, examples will draw upon studies that have used body mapping to explore the impact of undocumentedness among migrant workers residing in the Great Toronto Area; Photovoice to identify and explore what supports and hinders aging processes among elder migrants in Sweden and Japan; and video and photography in ethnography for microanalysis of transformative processes that emerge in the interactions between persons and symbolic representation of embodied experiences. Following the presentations, participants will be divided into 3 small facilitated groups, with each group focused on one type of consideration (i.e., epistemological, practical, ethical). These small groups will share their lists of key considerations, and lists will be circulated to all participants who provide email contact information.

The second part will provide opportunities for hands-on engagement, in 1 of 3 groups. In one group, working with participants’ research ideas, facilitators will guide participants through the process of developing a rationale for using visual methods, reflecting on their epistemological perspective, and attempting to fit their research purpose and epistemological position with a methodology. In the second group, facilitators will expose participants to various ways photos can be drawn upon in research, and explore possibilities for analyses and interpretation of photographs. In the third group, participants will be lead through an approach to analysis of video and photographic material from narrative-phenomenological perspectives. The workshop will end with a discussion focused on identifying future possibilities for the use of visual methodologies and methods in occupational science.

Key words: epistemology, ethics, reflexivity