Title

Poster Session - Transition Experienced by Parents of Adolescents Entering High School

Location

Winter Garden

Start Time

16-10-2014 6:00 PM

End Time

16-10-2014 9:00 PM

Abstract

Introduction: Transitions can have a profound impact on the person, their environment, and their occupations. It was thought that entering high school is a transition that has implications not only for the adolescent, but also for their family members.

Objectives: To gain an in-depth understanding of the lived experiences of parents whose adolescent child has recently entered high school. Three questions guided the research:

1. What is a parent’s lived experience with an adolescent child in transition?

2. Do parents also experience a transition when their child is in transition?

3. Is this transition compatible with the Model of Predictable Life Transition from an Occupation Perspective (MoPLT)?

Methods: This descriptive phenomenological study used semi-structured interviews to collect data from 5 parents with a child in grade 8 public high schools in Vancouver, Canada and surrounding area. Recruitment was conducted through convenience sampling. Participants were all female, married, between the ages of 35 and 54, and with a range of household income levels. All participants had multiple children, and for four participants it was their eldest child transitioning to high school.

Findings: Qualitative data was analyzed using thematic analysis. Four themes were developed that address the first research question: 1) Venturing into the Known and Unknown, 2) Collective Transition, 3) Negotiating Role Change, and 4) Redesigning Parent-Child Communication. All five participants reported experiencing a transition at the same time their adolescent child is transitioning to high school. Findings support compatibility with the Model of Predictable Life Transition (MoPLT).

Conclusion: Transitions create change and have the potential to disrupt occupation. A greater understanding from an occupation perspective of how people and groups adapt to life transition of one person is critical to understanding transition. This study highlights the theme of meaningful connections in the study of occupation, and contributes to a growing body of evidence on life transitions by exploring the impact of a predictable life transition on roles, routines, and occupations of parents with a child in his/her first year of high school.

References

References:

Brown, B., Smyl, J., Lee Bunting, K. & Forwell, S.J. (2013). Transition Model from an Occupation Perspective: An Emerging Model. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Crider, C., Calder, R., Lee Bunting, K. & Forwell, S.J. (2013). An Integrative Review of Occupational Science and Theoretical Literature Exploring Transition. Manuscript under review.

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Oct 16th, 6:00 PM Oct 16th, 9:00 PM

Poster Session - Transition Experienced by Parents of Adolescents Entering High School

Winter Garden

Introduction: Transitions can have a profound impact on the person, their environment, and their occupations. It was thought that entering high school is a transition that has implications not only for the adolescent, but also for their family members.

Objectives: To gain an in-depth understanding of the lived experiences of parents whose adolescent child has recently entered high school. Three questions guided the research:

1. What is a parent’s lived experience with an adolescent child in transition?

2. Do parents also experience a transition when their child is in transition?

3. Is this transition compatible with the Model of Predictable Life Transition from an Occupation Perspective (MoPLT)?

Methods: This descriptive phenomenological study used semi-structured interviews to collect data from 5 parents with a child in grade 8 public high schools in Vancouver, Canada and surrounding area. Recruitment was conducted through convenience sampling. Participants were all female, married, between the ages of 35 and 54, and with a range of household income levels. All participants had multiple children, and for four participants it was their eldest child transitioning to high school.

Findings: Qualitative data was analyzed using thematic analysis. Four themes were developed that address the first research question: 1) Venturing into the Known and Unknown, 2) Collective Transition, 3) Negotiating Role Change, and 4) Redesigning Parent-Child Communication. All five participants reported experiencing a transition at the same time their adolescent child is transitioning to high school. Findings support compatibility with the Model of Predictable Life Transition (MoPLT).

Conclusion: Transitions create change and have the potential to disrupt occupation. A greater understanding from an occupation perspective of how people and groups adapt to life transition of one person is critical to understanding transition. This study highlights the theme of meaningful connections in the study of occupation, and contributes to a growing body of evidence on life transitions by exploring the impact of a predictable life transition on roles, routines, and occupations of parents with a child in his/her first year of high school.