Title

Poster Session - The Lived Experience of Utilitarian Cyclists in Two Countries

Location

Winter Garden

Start Time

16-10-2014 6:00 PM

End Time

16-10-2014 9:00 PM

Abstract

This presentation will describe the experience of participation in physically active habitual occupations as an aspect of our daily lives. Many research studies have focused on the benefits of regular daily physical activity, including walking and bicycling (Wanner, Gotschi, Martin-Diener, Kahlmeier, & Martin, 2012; Pucher, Buehler, Bassett, & Dannenberg, 2010). However, there is a gap in the scholarly literature regarding the human experience of active commuting in the lives of those who cycle regularly, particularly when they replace automobile transport with bicycling (termed utilitarian cycling).

This research will address the question, “what is the lived experience of those who choose to commute regularly by bicycle, and how does that experience differ in countries that have policies that promote or discourage active transport?” Phenomenology, transportation policy, built environment, sustainability and occupational science perspectives will be incorporated into this study. The study will follow phenomenology design and analysis guidelines articulated by Creswell (2007). The study will include in-depth interviews of four research participants chosen from a convenience sample who choose regular utilitarian cycling; two participants will be identified from Baltimore, Maryland and two from Copenhagen, Denmark. Data will be collected through audio-taped Skype internet interviews of each individual, then transcribed and coded. Interviews will involve an occupational perspective of what cyclists should and shouldn’t do in cycling behavior, and patterns of behavior relating to desired active occupation. Analysis will involve identification of themes, and subsequent participant confirmation and review. A literature review of the transportation policy from each region, as well as phenomenological active occupation literature, will be included.

Health officials, transportation officials and political leaders suggest that increasing physical activity and decreasing energy consumption is a solution to our problems of obesity and ecological sustainability (Goins et al., 2013; Rabi & de Nazelle, 2012). This study invites a discussion about what it means to pursue an active and sustainable lifestyle by choosing active transport, and how transportation policy and environment influence participation in utilitarian cycling. This research will be of value to occupational scientists desiring information on how policy can influence modes of travel, occupational potential, and active occupation. Future research might look at how local policy influences transportation decisions for different socioeconomic classes and promotes or restricts occupational justice and inclusivity in our society.

Key Words: Active occupation, bicycling, transportation policy

References

Creswell, J.W. (2007). Qualitative Inquiry and Research Design: Choosing Among Five Approaches (2nd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Goins, K.V., Schneider, K.L., Brownson, R., Carnoske, C., Evenson, K.R., Eyler, A., …Lemon, S.C. (2013). Municipal officials' perceived barriers to consideration of physical activity in community design decision making. Journal of Public Health Management and Practice, 19(3), S65-73.

Pucher, J., Buehler, R., Bassett, D.R., & Dannenberg, A.L. (2010). Walking and cycling to health: a comparative analysis of city, state, and international data. American Journal of Public Health,100(10),1986 –1992.

Rabi, A. & de Nazelle, A. (2012). Benefits of shift from car to active transport. Transport Policy, 19(1), 121-131.

Wanner, M., Götschi, T., Martin-Diener, E., Kahlmeier, S., & Martin, B.W. (2012). Active transport, physical activity, and body weight in adults. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 42(5), 493-502.

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Oct 16th, 6:00 PM Oct 16th, 9:00 PM

Poster Session - The Lived Experience of Utilitarian Cyclists in Two Countries

Winter Garden

This presentation will describe the experience of participation in physically active habitual occupations as an aspect of our daily lives. Many research studies have focused on the benefits of regular daily physical activity, including walking and bicycling (Wanner, Gotschi, Martin-Diener, Kahlmeier, & Martin, 2012; Pucher, Buehler, Bassett, & Dannenberg, 2010). However, there is a gap in the scholarly literature regarding the human experience of active commuting in the lives of those who cycle regularly, particularly when they replace automobile transport with bicycling (termed utilitarian cycling).

This research will address the question, “what is the lived experience of those who choose to commute regularly by bicycle, and how does that experience differ in countries that have policies that promote or discourage active transport?” Phenomenology, transportation policy, built environment, sustainability and occupational science perspectives will be incorporated into this study. The study will follow phenomenology design and analysis guidelines articulated by Creswell (2007). The study will include in-depth interviews of four research participants chosen from a convenience sample who choose regular utilitarian cycling; two participants will be identified from Baltimore, Maryland and two from Copenhagen, Denmark. Data will be collected through audio-taped Skype internet interviews of each individual, then transcribed and coded. Interviews will involve an occupational perspective of what cyclists should and shouldn’t do in cycling behavior, and patterns of behavior relating to desired active occupation. Analysis will involve identification of themes, and subsequent participant confirmation and review. A literature review of the transportation policy from each region, as well as phenomenological active occupation literature, will be included.

Health officials, transportation officials and political leaders suggest that increasing physical activity and decreasing energy consumption is a solution to our problems of obesity and ecological sustainability (Goins et al., 2013; Rabi & de Nazelle, 2012). This study invites a discussion about what it means to pursue an active and sustainable lifestyle by choosing active transport, and how transportation policy and environment influence participation in utilitarian cycling. This research will be of value to occupational scientists desiring information on how policy can influence modes of travel, occupational potential, and active occupation. Future research might look at how local policy influences transportation decisions for different socioeconomic classes and promotes or restricts occupational justice and inclusivity in our society.

Key Words: Active occupation, bicycling, transportation policy